Five of Dallas' Best Breakfast Tacos

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Good Morning, tacos.






All week at City of Ate, we celebrate the magic of the taco. Check back for more interviews, essays and maybe a list or two. Or maybe four?

Ah, breakfast tacos. They look so easy, right? Scrambled eggs are one of the first foods every kid learns to cook, just after he's mastered the ability to toast his own Pop Tarts. Add in tortillas, chopped cilantro and onions, an extra protein or potatoes just for grins -- what could possibly go wrong?

Well, not much. In Dallas, we're blessed with a plethora of decent-to-pretty-good breakfast taco options. But, we at City of Ate believe that life is too short to merely avoid a rumbling stomach during a 10 a.m. meeting. Let's consider that our breakfast foods can rise above an a la carte existence. Let's believe that eggs and meat and cheese and salsa have the power to merge into a delicious symphony and then get wrapped up in a tortilla. Let's cram all of life's goodness into our bleary-eyed, kinda-hungover-and-kinda-just-don't-feel-like-working faces at once. 

Let's truly live, dammit.

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Quiz: Am I in a Kickass Taqueria?

Categories: Taco Week

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Alice Laussade
This is a safe taqueria. You are safe here.
All week at City of Ate, we celebrate the magic of the taco. Check back for more interviews, essays and maybe a list or two. Or maybe four?

There are many great taquerias in Dallas. There are also many taco poseurs. Weeding out the bad places from the good ones is part of the fun of taco adventuring, but we don't want you going out there flying completely blind. It's a waste of your precious taco time.

There are certain qualities that every good taqueria must have. The special, secret ingredients that make their tacos delicious. Things about the taqueria that say, "Hey! I'm fucking great. Come try my tacos and understand the meaning of life, bitches!"

See also: Ten of the Best Taquerias in Dallas-Fort Worth

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At a "Stylish Korean Kitchen" in Carrollton, a Delicious Taco of Questionable Taconess

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Gavin Cleaver
All week at City of Ate, we celebrate the magic of the taco. Check back for more interviews, essays and maybe a list or two. Or maybe four?

The little slice of Korea up in North Carrollton, where 35 meets PGBT, is pretty sweet. It's got a Super H Mart, where everything inside will baffle and amaze you, it's got umpteen Korean restaurants, Korean frozen yogurt places, Korean toy stores, Korean brunch places, there's even a Korean toilet store, where the toilets spray your butt with water.


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The Best Not-Taco Tacos in Dallas

Categories: Taco Week

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You're already eating this Sloppy Joe taco from Off-Site Kitchen
First: What's a Not Taco? A taco is that glorious lime-showered thing you dangled cilantro over. You already know that a taco can be novelty, like Cheeseburger enigma at Velvet Taco or Torchy's Tacos' Trailer Park taco, which has fried chicken and queso. You also already know that tacos can also (obviously) go gringo, with sour cream, cheddar and bright red chunks of America.

For the purposes of this post, we're defining a Not Taco as a Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle: a kick-ass mutation of the original, old staple, a taco that has adapted and changed in this hot, sour creamy North Texas environment. The Not Tacos range from sloppy joe to brisket (some require a little DIY), and I'd argue their some of the best things to eat in the city.

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If Our Squeamish Gringa Can Eat Brains at El Come Taco, You Can Too (Video)

Categories: Taco Week

All week at City of Ate, we celebrate the magic of the taco. Check back for more interviews, essays and maybe a list or two. Or maybe four?

El Come Taco is one of DFW's best taquerias. It's also got some "weird" stuff. Here's a video of a squeamish gringa eating said stuff.

When Dallas Taquerias Turn into Drag Shows

Categories: Taco Week

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Danny Fulgencio
Gabby Duarte performed at Los Altos de Jalisco on Abrams Road.
All week at City of Ate, we celebrate the magic of the taco. This story, by Taco Trail's Jose Ralat Maldonado, originally appeared in the Observer in 2011, and the accompanying photos, by Danny Fulgencio, were honored by the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies.

"Pistol-whipping" dick jokes, littered with chingas and pinches, spill from the glossy lips of an eye-poppingly beautiful woman in a rat-a-tat rhythm that keeps time with her hips as they shake to the beat of a Selena Gomez song. Colored lights above the corner stage whir back and forth, accentuating her dance moves at a taquería in East Dallas.

The restaurant, one-room Los Altos de Jalisco on Abrams Road, is decorated with beer flags and framed pastoral scenes leading back to a galley kitchen, where the cook is better at flirting with the waitress than reheating tortillas. It's a sleepy place during lunch hours, when, if more than one table is occupied, it's a rush. But that's not uncommon among the scores of tiny taco shops across the city. The only thing that makes Los Altos stand out from other taco joints is the white delivery van parked outside. Pasted on its sides are colorful ads for weekend drag shows.

Somehow, the brightly made-up images of women who were once men don't attract much of a lunchtime clientele. At night, it's a different world.

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The Favorite Tacos of Dallas' Chefs

Categories: Taco Week

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Salsa Limón
All week at City of Ate, we celebrate the magic of the taco. Check back for more interviews, essays and maybe a list or two. Or maybe four?

In this week of all things tacos at the City of Ate, we queried local chefs on their favorite spots to land some tacos. Here's what they had to say:

Oliver Sitrin, Blind Butcher
Taquería El Si Hay, the el pastor. Fresh, seasoning is just right. Also the pastor at La Banqueta. They're always good, fresh, hot. And Fuel City because they're open late.

See also: An Ode to Elotes, the Street Taco's BFF


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An Ode to Elotes, the Street Taco's BFF

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Catherine Downes
Get some.
All week at City of Ate, we celebrate the magic of the taco. Check back for more interviews, essays and maybe a list or two. Or maybe four?

Street tacos are glorious in and of themselves, but there is something equally delicious being served out of carts in front of taquerias across the city: elotes. In Mexico, this side dish and popular street food is typically served on the cob, but most versions you'll find in Dallas are served in styrofoam cups for your eating convenience.

If you haven't eaten elotes, the concept can sound off-putting. Why in the world would anyone put mayonnaise and queso fresco on corn? A genius, it turns out. The combination of mayo, corn, queso fresco, lime juice, and hot sauce hits every flavor note you could dream of: salty, sweet, spicy, tart and, most of all, rich.

See also: Ten of the Best Taquerias in Dallas-Fort Worth

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Meso Maya Chef Nico Sanchez on Dropping the Tex and Making Tortillas by Hand

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via Meso Maya
All week at City of Ate, we celebrate the magic of the taco. Check back for more interviews, essays and maybe a list or two. Or maybe four?

Dallas is famously flooded with goopy Velveeta queso and sour cream enchiladas, and certain corridors are lined with taquerias. But sit-down restaurants serving authentic Mexican cuisine are harder to find. At Meso Maya, Chef Nico Sanchez is cooking up complex and authentic dishes straight from the southern states of Mexico. We sat down with Sanchez to talk about elevating traditional Mexican cuisine, the love-hate relationship with Tex-Mex, and what it takes to make a good taco.

Meso Maya is an upscale version of traditional Mexican cuisine. What do you think it takes to elevate the food without changing it too much, something like a street taco?

The ingredients that we put in the taco. Typically, a taco is just a tortilla, meat, onions, cilantro, and your sauces. Limes on the side. We take a few different ingredients to make the taco a little more interesting, rather than just your meat, cilantro and onions. We add lettuce and perfectly-cut tomatoes, just the meat of the tomato and not the seeds and skin. And we're not shy about putting meat on our tacos, we put as much as we can in there without going too far on the other side of the line.

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