Let Dallas Shine a Light on the Nation with More Coffee-Shop Biscuits Like the Joule's

Categories: Eat This

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Coffee and ... biscuits?
While nothing complements a cup of coffee better than a baked something, many area coffee shops really muck that something up. I've encountered croissants with the consistency of challah bread and muffins that were dense and gooey. I've had stale scones that eat like biscotti and stale biscotti that eats like limestone. Sure, a quick dip in the coffee cup can soften things up, but baked goods should taste delicious on their own.

One thing I don't see a lot of at coffee shops are biscuits, which is weird, this being the south and all. Composed of flour, baking powder, fat and a liquid, biscuits are the quick bread of choice for everyone south of the Mason Dixon Line. Nearly every restaurant that sells you scrambled eggs will sell you a biscuit, but coffee shops? Not so much.


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Learning to Cook from the Edible Dallas & Fort Worth Cookbook, One Dallas Dish at a Time

Categories: Eat This

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Kelsey Sidwell
In the beginning, there were carrots.
I am by no means a great cook. I do not own a lot of the things I should for some of the recipes I undertake, and I tend to get panicked and just start throwing things together and praying it works. Double boiler? Nope. I'm gonna boil some water in a large pot and then sit another pot down inside of it. Boom. It's a double boiler.

I'm not terrible: I have some good knives and one quality skillet that I rely on for everything. I know the basic chemistry behind cooking and I am actually a better than average baker. But I don't cook a lot, and when I do, it's the basics. Anything more time-consuming than a simple pasta dish and I am out. So I figured, just for fun, why not try out some long and complicated recipes from local Dallas chefs and restaurants and see what happens? Totally reasonable, right?

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Visual: Breaking Down the Char Bar at Asador

Categories: Eat This

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foodbitch
All of the above
"I find the pastrami to be the most sensual of all the salted, cured meats."

George Costanza was right about one thing: charcuterie is damn sexy. Case in point: The Char Bar at Asador Restaurant inside the Renaissance Dallas Hotel.

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Taqueria Latina Brings Solid Tacos on Handmade Tortillas to East Dallas

Categories: Eat This

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There are good things happening inside.
The number of taquerias in Dallas that serve their taco fillings on handmade tortillas is limited. Most employ the standard working man's tortilla, an honest round pressed from masa that's reheated on a hot grill. These tortillas are dependable and get the job done, but their texture is lacking. They're tough, a little rubbery, and they sit in your stomach like corn-flavored lead.

So when you encounter a tortilla that was freshly griddled in the same kitchen where your cabeza was cooked down from a cow's head, your spirits should be lifted. Handmade tortillas, like the ones made at Taqueria Latina, are soft and tender. They have ragged edges that bloom like tiny petals, and they're giving and supple when you pick them up.

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A Longtime Bartender Bought Knox Street Pub and Made It Great, with Help from These Wings

Categories: Eat This

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The buffalo style chicken wings at Knox Street Pub
When the former owners of Knox Street Pub sold their business last summer to eventually open Glass Boot Biergarten, not much attention was paid to the business they left behind. The Boguses renovated a liquor store to open a restaurant and bar with a massive patio, only to have the place close months after opening.

But back down McKinney Avenue, their old pub continued to thrive, and while most of the changes to the place in the past year have been subtle, the part bar, part restaurant, part dance club deserves a some additional attention, if only for this awesome plate of chicken wings.

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At Oak Cliff's New Joy Macarons, a Home Baker's Dream Comes True Before Your Eyes

Categories: Eat This

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The front case is packed with interesting flavors.
About two weeks ago, a new storefront opened up on West Davis Street in Oak Cliff, near Spinster, Glass Optical and Davis Street Espresso. Joy Macarons, it's called, and it offers macarons, obviously. But don't expect to meet a baker named Joy when you visit.

"It's Liz, by the way," the owner said when I visited, as she handed me her card as I thanked her for her time. The name Joy painted on the shop's front window wasn't a person but an emotion: the feeling owner Liz Lanier hopes you will experience when you take a bite from a bright yellow macaron expecting only sweetness and lemony citrus and are instead greeted by the briny prick of fleur de sel, too.

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Blind Butcher Adds Even More Meat to Their Menu

Categories: Eat This

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The duck spaetzel at Blind Butcher.
The folks at the Blind Butcher laminated a new menu recently, adding a number of options for beer drinkers stumbling around Lower Greenville Avenue. Not to worry, the same meaty theme is in full effect, there's just a few new items to round out the menu and close off your arteries.

Let's start with a dish that makes use of tripe and a pig's tail. I'd have included a picture, but it just didn't seem like the responsible thing to do (a combination of low lighting and jiggling pork fat made for a most gratuitous image) but if you venture out and order the dish on your own, here's what you'll see:

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Monkey King Makes the Perfect Feel-Good Chicken Noodle Soup

Categories: Eat This

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The cure
It's that time of year, when the sky clouds over, everything gets damp and everyone's immune systems start to fall apart. The clerks at CVS are fronting the NyQuil section every other hour, noses are red and taste buds are shot. It's inevitable that either you or someone you know will succumb to a cold, the flu or some other cold-weather funk, and when the sniffles commence and Kleenex becomes a commodity, the gift of soup can be a godsend.

If you know someone who's got the funk, you can be their savior. Show up on their doorstep with a steamy container of chicken noodle soup and you'll have someone in your back pocket should you fall ill yourself or ever need a ride to the airport. And the best place to pick up soup for delivery, should you find yourself in need, can be found in Deep Ellum at Monkey King Noodle Co.


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Bulletproof Coffee Has Arrived in Dallas

Categories: Eat This

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It definitely won't stop hot lead, but it could make you feel bulletproof.
You may have heard by now of bulletproof coffee, the coffee drink doctored up with as much as two tablespoons of butter that's gaining popularity for its purported health benefits. A bulletproof coffee in the morning will help you burn fat all day, they say. Bulletproof coffee will increase mental energy, they say. Bulletproof coffee will help you climb tall mountains, they say.

Whatever it is they're saying, the trend is growing and has finally made its way to Dallas by way of the Green Grocer. For $3 and some change, you can have your own bulletproof coffee made right in front of your eyes from locally roasted coffee beans. Think of what you could accomplish at the office.

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How to Roast a Pig the Urban Acres Way

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A pork sandwich made from a whole-roast pig at Urban Acres.
On Saturday afternoon, the smoke was a beacon, luring cars and trucks from nearby Beckley Avenue as they drove towards Urban Acres. One truck hit the brakes hard to pull into the lot before passing by as owner Steven Bailey tended the coals that were putting up the thick, white smoke.

See also: Urban Acres Farm and Restaurant: This Is What Eating Local in Dallas Should Taste Like

"We built it entirely from materials we had on hand," Bailey said, and sure enough the walls of his smoker were fashioned from old cement blocks stacked in a ring. An opening was left in the front so air could drift across the coals, taking the smoke and heat inside. That's where the pig sat, splayed in two halves on a metal table top with pans to collect the pork drippings. All of it was capped off by another piece of steel that held in the heat.

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