Cheese-maker Dave Eagle: It Takes Passion to Make it in the Cheese World

Categories: Cheese Week

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Dave Eagle of Eagle Mountain Farmhouse Cheese in Granbury speaks with a strong Texas swagger and often in a very direct, to-the-point manner. Before becoming a cheese maker, he practiced law. And I suspect that if you were involved in some type of litigation, you'd want him on your side of the table. He brings fervor to everything he talks about, including the cheese business.

Eagle initially got into cheese making after simply waking up one day and realizing it was time for a change. Several trips to Europe served as inspiration -- particularly small farmers markets in France, Germany and Switzerland where he discovered the subtle nuances and amazing flavor of handcrafted cheese.

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Seven Cheese Things That Must Really Annoy Good Cheese

Categories: Cheese Week

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bonappetit.com
American Cheese is a disgrace to cheese.

If I were Actual Cheese, I'd be super annoyed by all the cheese poseurs in the grocery store these days. I bet Actual Cheese looks at Cheez Whiz in exactly the same way a 60 year-old dude from Austin looks at all the college kids who moved to Austin last year and constantly complain about the tourists during "South By." It's a look that has to involve 10 percent pity, 90 percent head shake.

Here are seven annoying cheese products that most times aren't even cheese, and if they are cheese, they're definitely a disgrace to the entire cheese race. Shame on you for loving them.

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A Guide to British Cheese That Isn't Cheddar

Categories: Cheese Week

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Wikimedia
Continuing our celebration of cheese week, we asked resident British person Gavin Cleaver to tell us about cheese in the U.K., because we are fascinated by a people who have no concept of smoked brisket. Plus, his answers are usually pretty strange entertaining. We have no idea how much of what he tells us is true.

While there is little more depressing than the cheese section at a Walmart dairy aisle (cheddar, mozzarella, more varieties of string cheese than are necessary or even feasible), the state of British cheese, much like the state of British cuisine, is not one of worldwide envy. As our national intake is 51 percent cheddar, a British invention no less, the impression of unbearable blandness is pretty much accurate in this case.

Given that French cheese is banned in the UK on the grounds of it being French and thus wrong and unclean, we are reduced to a number of variations on cheddar -- firm, mildly flavoured cheeses that are easy to melt and simple to understand. We don't get the more complex cheeses. Here are three variations on cheddar that bring back fond childhood memories for me, usually when combined with extremely plain white bread.


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FDA Holds Back Cheese Because of Cheese Mites

Categories: Cheese Week

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Wiki
The FDA recently held a shipment of Mimolette, an aged French cheese that has been shipped to America for decades. The cheese has a round, wrinkled and tough exterior hiding a bright orange center. Fans compare it visually to cantaloupe. The FDA hold on the 1,100 pound shipment means it can no longer be sold in the U.S.

The news caused angry cheese hoarders to take to the streets in New York last weekend, protesting what they felt was an unnecessary restriction on their beloved fromage. The FDA disagreed -- cheese mites were to blame, and the affected wheels could cause potential allergies.

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Latte Da Dairy in Flower Mound on Award Winning Goat Cheese And Raising 31 Kids

Categories: Cheese Week

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Latte Da Dairy
Anne and Johnny Jones started Latte Da Dairy in 2005 with five acres of land and a wild cheese-making dream. Anne, a veterinarian by trade, bought just two goats to get started and named them Serenity and Rosemary. But, no kidding, things have really changed in eight years. On April Fool's Day this year (although it absolutely wasn't a joke) they posted pictures of the most recent addition to their herd, "Babies 30 & 31 born last night. 2 LaMancha boys."

The Jones have both LaManchas and Nubians, which are a breed of goats that produce milk with a high butterfat content and, since they are by genetically inclined to tolerate warmer temperatures, are the ideal dairy goats for this area. The Nubians' long soft ears frame almond-shaped eyes that give them a delicate and wise appearance.


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An Ode to Stacks of Amazing Grilled Cheese Sandwiches Via Pinterest

Categories: Cheese Week

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Pinterest

I've said it before and I'll say it again: Pinterest will kill your soul. Pinterest is select-league baseball for 9-year olds. You think it's just a silly game, but you're wrong. This is life: It's real and it hurts. Don't you dare come to this game and pick dandelions in the outfield (unless your high-dollar camera has a zoom lens to really make it pop and diffuse the edges).Yes, I'm writing about a hobby-based photo-sharing website. But, there are no hobbyists here, these are professionals of ... something. Pinterest, I suppose.

It's Cheese Week! See also:
- The Awesome Cheese Boards of Dallas
- Scardello's Washed-Rind Cheeses

This is exactly why I stay off of Pinterest (most of the time). I don't have an A-game in this genre. It scares me. I shiver at my horrible camera skills and my deplorable lack of stack-manship (like penmanship, but with stacking), among many other things.

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The Never-Ending Cycle of Queso Enjoyment

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Dan Zettwoch
Editor's note: Last year we published an instructive blog post detailing the various stages queso exhibits as it emerges from the kitchen and sits on your table. Since it's cheese week, and queso is the greatest cheese dish in the history of ever, we decided it was a good time to bring the never-ending cycle of queso enjoyment back to life. Grab a chip and get to scooping.

Queso may be borne out of one of the most forgiving recipes known to man. In its most simple incarnation, a block of Velveta is heated till viscous and seasoned with a can of Rotel and whatever else you have in the bloated cans on your pantry shelf. More refined recipes might fold higher quality cheese into a base of chorizo and onions, but the results are the same: a warm sea of gluey milk fat that's so good your synapses and neurons create a tapestry of deceit that convince you to eat an entire bowlful.

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Forget Taco Bell: Taco Casa Will Satisfy Your Ultimate Cheese Fetish

Categories: Cheese Week

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Money Shot.
It's Cheese Week here on Earth. While Scott says things like "affinage" and "huffing bathroom cleaner," let's talk about the cheese that we all eat whether we admit it or not (because sometimes the electric bill is WHAT and you're broke for a week or three). So I'll just go ahead and admit it for all of us, taco cheese is the guiltiest of cheese pleasure. It's cheap, it's frighteningly yellow and it's the most delicious part of the dollar-ish you just paid for an entire meal wrapped in waxy paper and thrown through your car window. Sometimes landing on your dog passenger.

But you know what it's not? It's not abundant. It's not spilling over the side of the tortilla or completely obscuring the edge of your tostada shell. That shredded, neon yellow Tex-Mex staple is usually presented as an afterthought. A casual sprinkle. Sometimes it looks like your taco construction representative climbed a 12-foot ladder and blew a few shreds of cheese from his or her palm and whatever landed atop your taco got to go home in your belly. Exhibit A: Taco Bell. There are 12 shreds of cheese on that sad taco. To this I say, FOR SHAME.

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The Awesome Cheeseboards of Dallas, and What is On Each Of Them

Categories: Cheese Week

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Photos by Catherine Downes

Here are some samples of the beautifully plated cheeseboards we photographed for cheese week.

SEE ALSO: PHOTOS: The Awesome Cheese Boards of Dallas.

Scardello Artisan Cheese (3511 Oak Lawn)
1. Dried Cherries
2. Apricots
3. Black mission figs
4/5. Marcona almonds (skin off and on)
6. Italian Baguette: Empire Bakery
7. Bay Blue: U.S., cow
8. Basseri: U.S., sheep
9. Alter Schweizer: Switzerland, cow
10. Bloombonnet: U.S., goat
11. Cremeux de Citeaux aux Truffes (Citeaux with Truffles): France, cow

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Cheese Rinds: When To Eat Them and When To Leave Them On The Board

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Maybe don't eat this one.
Surely you've asked the question while eating funky cheeses with friends. "Are we supposed to eat the rind or not?" Unless you're surrounded by a bunch of cheese nerds, the answers that come back likely have as many holes as a cartoonish slice of Swiss.

Even with the mild rind of a brie cheese you've undoubtedly encountered a few friends who carefully cut their way around the snowy white outer layer to get at the good stuff inside, while others almost savor the rind. And as the exteriors get more and more robust, the rind lovers slowly lose their enthusiasm for the taste of mold and time.

So how do you really know if you should be eating the stuff? Paula Lambert, the woman behind the Mozzarella Co. in Deep Ellum answers simply. "It depends on if you like the way it tastes." That ubiquitous brie, for instance, is encased by a rind of penicillium bacteria, which imparts a soft, tender rind that tastes a bit like mushrooms. Skip the rind on one of these carefully aged cheese and you'll be missing on the best part.

Other rinds however, are a little less palatable

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