There Are Wild Boar Empanadas at FM Smokehouse, and You Want to Eat Them

Categories: Eat This

FMSmokehouseBoar_opt.jpg
Amy McCarthy
Meat + Pie = Obviously
Most people in Dallas have no real reason to venture over to Irving for dinner, but FM Smokehouse is the exception to the rule, and the kind of place that might change your mind about venturing that way.

Owner Brian Rudolph, best known for his craft beer-focused Holy Grail Pub in West Plano, has worked with Chef Marcus Cutler to create a smoked meat sanctuary in the suburbs that rivals Dallas' best barbecue spots, especially when you factor in an extensive and well-curated selection of craft beers from Texas and beyond.

Besides the booze, you'll find a few inventive dishes among the usual smoked brisket and ribs. A spicy slow-smoked goat that's stuffed into housemade corn tortillas for a riff on Mexican street tacos is unique, along with a massive smoked brisket-topped Fritos chili pie. Most importantly, though, you're going to want to order a plate of the wild boar empanadas all to yourself. These tiny little fried pies are too good to share.

What's great about these empanadas is how simple they are. Tender chunks of smoked boar, roasted peppers and cheese are tucked into a flaky and perfectly crisp pie crust. There aren't a lot of fancy ingredients in this dish, but the intense flavor of the smoked boar is enough to make each bite satisfying. A tomato relish that resembles pico de gallo adds freshness and a touch of acidity that keeps the empanadas from being over-the-top rich.

There is definitely a little kick to these wild boar empanadas, provided by bits of spicy jalapeño or serrano pepper. A creamy sauce made with Austin's 512 Brewing Company Pecan Porter is drizzled over the top, but its subtle nuttiness is overpowered by all the spice, so ask for a little extra on the side. If you forget, no matter -- that just means you're going to need another Velvet Hammer. Or two.


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14 comments
kergo1spaceship
kergo1spaceship

Is it Trinity River wild boar? I often see these critters when I'm "out and about", and wonder what they must taste like? I imagine the meat is pretty tough and gamy; I'd be interested to try this dish.  Oh, wait, it's in Irving. 

CitizenKane
CitizenKane

Generally, when I see the term "wild" I think of game that is truly free range (not fenced), has been hunted and field dressed.  I doubt that the above boar is "wild" in this sense.


So I am curious what the chef means by his description of Wild...If an animal is commercially raised on a fenced property, then slaughtered and processed under USDA guidelines, it ain't "wild", it is as domesticated as the cow............


But then "domesticated" boar empanadas just doesn't have the same appeal.

primi_timpano
primi_timpano topcommenter

It is my understanding they are trapped, caged, fattened and slaughtered.

Joshstruckoutagain
Joshstruckoutagain

@kergo1spaceship  Quite sure Kergs would want to try a juvenile wild boar, the older and scragglier they get the worse they are. Much like all of us, if'n we're lucky.

let0062
let0062

@CitizenKane Wild boar are extremely overpopulated in texas and Texas actually offers money to people who hunt them. It is very likely that they are infact wild.

CitizenKane
CitizenKane

And yes, I have hunted, field dressed and prepared wild boar.  it is wonderfully nutty from the pecans and acorns with notes of sage from the grasses it has feasted upon...especially the younger boar...hunting them is fun, hard work and can be dangerous.

CitizenKane
CitizenKane

@let0062 I am well aware of the problem on ranches....The city of Dallas pays bounty hunters to trap the animal....But state laws prevent the commercial sale of hunted game unless it has been harvested and processed under USDA inspection.  I doubt bounty hunters are legally meeting those requirements.


But if I am wrong, then let Amy tell us.  I think it is just a misnomer that is too frequently thrown around in the food world.


I really would like to know what qualifies as "wild" boar at this restaurant.  And I would be interested to know what cut of the animal is used in the empanadas - loin, rib meat, ham, etc.


Just trying to elevate the level of understanding a bit...out of respect for the wild animal that is being consumed.  If it is wild.

Joshstruckoutagain
Joshstruckoutagain

@CitizenKane  From the read it seems as if Amy actually did eat it, that's a step up from some of the "reviews" up in here.  Don't expect the high heat around here, it's more a slowpitch interview style....except for Alice, cause she'll cuss at ya in a heartbeat.

Junebug
Junebug

@CitizenKane My guess is by "wild" they mean the hybrid feral hogs strain that's been farm raised and processed under USDA regulations.


Rather than domesticated breeds of pigs.


Similar to what's done for "game" meats such as Elk etc that are found on some restaurant menus.

CitizenKane
CitizenKane

@Junebug @CitizenKane You are likely correct.....But what restaurant advertises "wild" elk steaks ????? 


The use of "wild" is total bullshit by the chef.....those farm raised hogs aren't any more 'wild" than the beef cows raised by the millions.   And the same with the new food craze - buffalo.  

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