The Greek Is Closed in One Arts Plaza, and One Arts Plaza Is Still Boring

THEGREEK_signage.jpg
Food Bitch
Last May I hit my breaking point with One Arts Plaza after I reviewed The Greek, which was a major disappointment. I wrote that the menu might provide a decent substitute for sleeping pills and described some of the ingredients used there as terrible. The restaurant closed yesterday, as reported by The Dallas Morning News. No big surprise.

Before The Greek came and went, John Tesar's The Commissary, whose burgers many still miss, opened and closed, and before that Dali. The space appears doomed.

See also: The Restaurants of One Arts Plaza are Officially a Snooze

In that same time, a different space across One Arts Plaza has had two restaurants open and close. The Screen Door shuttered despite an often busy dinning room, and subsequent Cafe Des Artists closed last December. Alberto Lombardi said the decision was strategic and that the restaurant did acceptable business, but News critic Leslie Brenner awarded just one star in her review.

While the remainder of the restaurants have survived, they don't provide One Arts with any sort of cohesive identity. Jorge's Tex-Mex Cafe and Fedora Northern Italian have loyal followings but seldom generate anything resembling buzz. Then there's Tei-An: a bright star spiraling an otherwise black hole.

Two restaurants are slated to take over the now empty spaces at the front of the plaza and one is only described "national" and the other local (Hooters and Cane Rosso?). For them and whatever comes after them, the question will remain: Is the Arts District busy enough all week to sustain that many higher-end restaurants? For now, anyway, the answer continues to be "no."

Location Info

The Greek

1722 Routh St., Dallas, TX

Category: Restaurant


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16 comments
mremanne
mremanne

Actually, a Hooter's wouldn't be such a bad idea.The Arts District is an entertainment center, but there's very little entertainment in the One Arts locale.What it really needs is a destination bar or nightclub to bring people into the space.Of course, as One Arts is a residential building, that will prove problematic. Late-night clubbers tend to annoy those trying to get a nights sleep. But whatever they do, the One Arts management needs to think in more creative terms.

J_A_
J_A_

The rent is too damn high! Do people still go to Hooters? I haven't been to the one in West End in yeeeeeeears.

Cliffhanger
Cliffhanger

Just open another freakin' Starbucks to cater to the Booker T. kids.

ScottsMerkin
ScottsMerkin topcommenter

I blame it on Woodall Freeway, lets tear it down so we can connect uptown to the arts district and more people will come

oakclifftownie
oakclifftownie

Stopping to get a bite to eat is still of secondary importance when safely getting In and Out of the city center is the primary concern of the fearful suburbanite who comes into the area for the show.

pastmybedtime
pastmybedtime

If the restaurants would stay open past 10pm, at least Thurs-Sun, they would maybe catch a lot of the traffic exiting the shows. It's right there, walking distance from all of those theatres, and people want a place to go afterwards. It's disappointing to find they closed 15 min prior and you might as well just drive home. 

Oxtail
Oxtail

Sometimes I think Dallas' developers just don't understand their demographic. Just like Victory Park, One Arts feels like it was constructed with high end disposable income in mind when in truth, Dallas proper is more blue collar. There would be more foot traffic there if they put in a Chipolte and a beer garden.

Greg820
Greg820

The nebulous blend of food quality, atmosphere, service, location and surroundings will always be a vexing challenge.  The biggest issue with One Arts is the surroundings.  There are none.  Want to go for a little walk after dinner at One Arts?  What do you do, walk around the parking lot and look at the concrete?  Want to grab a dink somewhere before heading home?  Not at One Arts.  So why take the extra time to go there if you have to go somewhere else afterward, valet yet again, get comfortable in your new surroundings . . . . . there is just no convenience.  Tei-An (and Stephen Pyles in the same general area) succeed because they have the first three qualities.  Without excellent food quality no one will take the extra time to go there.  Lastly, maybe, just maybe, designers of these spaces are beginning to realize that mass expanses of sterile concrete do not appeal to people.  

kduble
kduble

@Cliffhanger What's needed to make the district work is drawing foot traffic nights and weekends.

kduble
kduble

@pastmybedtimeIt's hard to draw clientele when there's no foot traffic.My wife and i take DART to Pearl, but we're the exception. Most show goers tend to park underground, ride the elevators up, then descend back down and drive away when the shows are over.


If we had the kind of low-rise apartments in the Arts District we have in Cityplace, Uptown, Victory and the West End, rather than Museum Tower and Lucy Billingsley's tall tower, dining venues might have a chance. Craig Hall's building should help a lot, as should the new building for artists.

kduble
kduble

@Oxtail I dunno. The two constituencies seem to be the expense account crowd for lunch and the show-goers nights and weekends. Not exactly a taco and beer set.

theslowpath
theslowpath

@Greg820  Spaces there will continue top struggle until there is more residential and office development around the district. There are several buildings on the books but they've been stuck in development limbo forever, it seems. 

kduble
kduble

@oakclifftownie The obstacle isn't perceptions of safety. Rather, it's the lack of foot traffic resulting from underground parking at the venues and the limited residential component.

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