The Best Way to Reheat Your Pizza Is In a Frying Pan

Categories: Cook This

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Late night pizza reheated at home just might be better than the original.
While checking in on Jay Jerrier's Zoli's NY Pizza, I indulged in many, many pizzas. I ordered slices for lunch and I ordered entire pies for dinner. I ordered pies to take home, and I ordered slices for lunch again the next day.

This pizza binge afforded me all sorts of benefits including an excess of calories, a window into the consistency of the pizza at Zoli's, knowledge that Zoli's pizza boxes will not fit in your fridge and a lot of leftover (sometimes improperly stored) pizza.

With respect to the consistency of of Zoli's pies, they're all over the map. Pizza by the slice is always crisp, but whole pies are often blonde-crusted and droopy. I tried ordering a few pies well-done and the move helped. Consider following suit if you like a snappy crust.

However you order it, if you take some home stay away from the microwave, which will absolutely ruin your leftovers. And even if you like pizza cold the next day, consider this tip. I converted at least one cold pizza advocate using it.

See Also:This week's review: Zoli's NY Pizza

While any pan will do, heavier pans will heat your slice more evenly. Cast iron, anodized aluminum, the over-priced copper number you got as a wedding gift -- it doesn't matter -- just toss the pan on a burner, turn the heat to low and slide a slice of leftover pizza in. Chances are, low won't be hot enough, so slowly step up the heat until you find the sweet spot for your particular stove and pan combination. Then you can turn out slice after slice.

A properly cooked slice will be richly browned on the bottom, and not burn before it's heated though. Check the underside on occasion and wait for bubbles of oil to well up on the top. That's when you know you're done.

Now eat it. Trust me, the microwave, the oven, your fireplace -- none of these heat sources will recreate this textural achievement. It's crisp yet soft, and fresh tasting, and just as good as what came out of the oven at the pizzeria.

The only problem is volume. Stove-top pizza heating is a slow process. Fire up a few more burners if you think you're a pizza Jedi, but be careful. Burning leftover pizza is upsetting, especially if it's late at night and your guests have been drinking.

Location Info

Zoli's NY Pizza Tavern

202 W. Davis St., Dallas, TX

Category: Restaurant

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19 comments
J_A_
J_A_

This is the best fucking thing ever! I will never re-heat pizza any other way again!

Twinwillow
Twinwillow

In the current issue of the highly respected, Cook's Illustrated, they recommend putting leftover pizza slices on a pre-heated cookie sheet, cover with foil and warm in a slow oven (250 degrees) for about 20-25 minutes. Works great! Or as JustSaying says below, covering the pan with foil works just as well. But, a cookie sheet will hold more slices if needed.

J_A_
J_A_

Why didn't I ever think of this? Now I want zolis

beckw
beckw

Throw a lid on the pan for better results

elenaran
elenaran

i usually throw it on the pizza stone in the oven, set to 400-425, and when the oven is done pre-heating, the pizza is done (w/ crispy crust)

wescx
wescx

Ashamed I never thought of this.

primi_timpano
primi_timpano topcommenter

TW, makes sense. I don't think--though I have never tried--too stove reheating alone would evenly heat the slice. And let us not forget to praise the joys of cold/room temperature pizza.

JustSaying
JustSaying

@Twinwillow Thanks for the tip, Twinwillow. That definitely makes more sense if you are reheating several slices for multiple people. Granted, its pretty few and far between that I have that much pizza left over. Usually if I do, its because it wasn't very good in the first place. I occasionally get a pizza from Fratelli to squash a craving but that has to be the worst pizza when it comes to reheating it the next day. I bet your cookie sheet method will greatly improve it.

juanmayeaux
juanmayeaux

@Twinwillow  You are very correct, this works as a safer method from burning. It works better for heating many slices or a partial pie. If you have one or two slices, putting your oven safe skillet in the oven to heat always works for me. A little spray of water on the toppings before you heat, keeps them from drying out during the re-heat process.

JustSaying
JustSaying

@beckw Hell, aluminum foil over the skillet works just as well.

scott.reitz
scott.reitz moderator

@elenaran As long as you line that stone with something (and have one) that sounds like a plan. Now I've got an excuse to buy another pizza and let it sit around.

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