Joe Yonan Is Coming to Central Market to Prove That Veggies Don't Have to Suck

Categories: Food News

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He's not kidding, you better eat 'em.
You've done it again, haven't you? You've got plans to go out and get burgers tonight, and then tomorrow you've got three buddies ready to pile into a car for a day-long barbecue road trip. You'll probably end the night with late-night tacos before you wake up and pummel yourself with a bacon-heavy brunch.

It doesn't have to be this way.

There was a reason your mother yelled at you when you left broccoli on your plate, and Joe Yonan, the food and travel editor at the Washington Post, has turned her words into a battle cry. He's coming to Central Market for a stop on his book tour to tell you firmly, but politely, to Eat Your Vegetables.

Yonan's visit is part of the Central Market's series of cooking classes, and he plans to demonstrate his love of veg with recipes for poblano tapenade, kimchi deviled eggs, kabocha squash, tofu curry and more. And the book has an added twist in that it's geared for single cooks who often find themselves cooking for one, with manageable portions that will keep you from eating leftovers for five days straight.

Perhaps the last time you failed to incorporate more vegetables into your diet you put too much faith in that freezer-burnt veggie burger you thought you could make delicious. (You can't.) Simple greens with sesame miso vinaigrette, on the other hand? You might not even miss that rib-eye.

And if you do, those greens would make a killer side.

Fees for the class are $65 and come with the copy of the book. Click here to sign up.

Eat Your Vegetables with Joe Yonan, Monday, October 21, 6:30 p.m., Lovers Lane Central Market

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6 comments
primi_timpano
primi_timpano topcommenter

Love kimchee but can't deal with the salt. Last night I made deviled eggs with horseradish, mayo, mustard, and serranos. Turned out good but not a show stopper.

Myrna.Minkoff-Katz
Myrna.Minkoff-Katz topcommenter

$65 to learn how to cook something you'll never cook.  Kimchi deviled eggs... I don't think so. 

Sharon_Moreanus
Sharon_Moreanus topcommenter

There purdy good.

6 eggs

3/4 cup kimchi, preferably spicy

1/4 cup cream cheese

Sriracha, to taste

Prick each egg just barely through the shell on the rounded end, using an egg pricker or a thumbtack.

Bring a medium saucepan full of water to the boil. Reduce heat so that the water is at a simmer. Use a slotted spoon to carefully lower each egg into the water, and to stir them frequently for the first minute or so of cooking. (This helps set the yolks in the center.)

Cook them for 9 minutes, then transfer them to a bowl of ice water into which you have dissolved 2 tablespoons of baking soda. As soon as you can handle the eggs, reach into the water and crack them all over, keeping them in the water. Remove them one at a time and remove a large piece of the shell at the rounded end, where an air pocket should be, and return them to the water. (This helps water get between the egg and the shell for easier peeling.) Remove one egg at a time, slip off the rest of the shell, and return it to the water as you continue peeling.

Transfer the peeled eggs to a countertop, and slice each one neatly in half. Pop out each yolk half with your fingers into the bowl of a food processor or blender.

Add 1/2 cup of the kimchi and all the cream cheese to the food processor or blender and purée until smooth. Taste, and add a little at a time if you want it to be spicier.

Use a teaspoon to carefully fill each egg white half with the kimchi mixture, mounding it on top. Finely chop the remaining 1/4 cup kimchi and sprinkle it on top of the eggs. If desired, squirt a few drops of Sriracha on each egg.

Refrigerate the stuffed eggs for at least 1 hour, covered, so the cream cheese firms up. They can be refrigerated in an airtight container for up to 2 days.

Myrna.Minkoff-Katz
Myrna.Minkoff-Katz topcommenter

@Sharon_Moreanus  I only like heated kimchi.  It's great included in vegetable soup or as a substitute for sauerkraut with kielbasza.

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