Nine Artisan Foods in Dallas That You Should Be Eating (or Chugging) Right Now

Categories: Best Of Dallas

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Stanton Stevens
Michael Peticolas makes the artisan thing that makes the other artisan things even better: beer.
The term "artisan" is hot in food marketing, joining its precursors "natural" and "gourmet" as a way to make consumer-grade food products sound like authentic works of culinary art. Tostito's Artisan Recipe chips? Wendy's Artisan Flatbread Sandwiches? Domino's Artisan Pizzas? That creepy Sargento commercial where the dude in the Authentic Wood-Grained Traditional Workshop sniffs the wheel of cheese? Come on, international corporate conglomerates. We're not that easily fooled.

We know that even in Dallas, there are lots of real people making small batches of hand-crafted, locally sourced, actually natural and delicious food. Here are a few of our current favorites.

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Courtesy of Noble Coyote
Noble Coyote Coffee Company's Café Momentum Blend
Kevin Sprague and his wife, Marta, started Noble Coyote Coffee Company after roasting coffee on their countertop for over a decade. Now roasted in small batches near White Rock Lake, Noble Coyote is regularly featured in other Dallas products, including Lakewood Brewing's Bourbon Espresso Temptress, Pop-Star's Coffee Popsicles and Carnival Barker's Ice Cream.

Their Cafe Momentum blend mixes Guatemalan and Ethiopian beans to deliver an agreeable balance of subtle cherry notes with a cocoa finish. There's a lot of great coffee in Dallas these days, but Noble Coyote has risen slightly above the rest by focusing exclusively on procuring great beans and roasting them perfectly.

*****

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Carnival Barker's Ice Cream's Fat Elvis
It feels like forever ago (though it's only been about eight weeks) that Sarah Miller and Aaron Barker, the duo behind the best ice cream in Dallas, were informed that they didn't have the required dairy license to continue to sell their ice cream wholesale. To resolve this issue, they could either start using a crappy, artificial, state-certified ice cream base or spend $14,000 on a fancy pasteurizer. They chose the latter.

After a successful fundraiser, they're working hard to get back to churning, and Carnival Barker's should be available again sometime this month. Until then, you can only dream about this handmade, decadently rich and creamy perfection. Their best selling flavor is Fat Elvis, a peanut butter and banana ice cream with honey swirls and bacon pieces.

Bacon? In ice cream? The internet rejoices.

*****

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Cita's Salsa's Red Rage Salsa
The only thing worse than an overworked salsa with too many ingredients is a weak, national supermarket brand jar of tomato-flavored water. Cita's is neither of those. It's substantial enough to ride out a perilous journey from the community bowl to your face without dripping, but light enough that it won't spoil your appetite for whatever's coming next. Red Rage is grounded in a base of stewed tomatoes and packs some heat, but it's pleasantly mitigated by the sweet and sour flavor of pickled carrots.

*****


Location Info

Mozzarella Company

2944 Elm St., Dallas, TX

Category: Restaurant

Dude, Sweet Chocolate

408 W. 8th St., Dallas, TX

Category: Restaurant

Jimmy's Food Store

4901 Bryan St., Dallas, TX

Category: Restaurant


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11 comments
unoit
unoit

great beer being made at Peticolas but my favorite is Great Scot

Angela Ra
Angela Ra

Cita's Salsa is the best!!!!

sleepyhead420
sleepyhead420

Velvet Hammer...that is some good beer. It deserves whatever prizes it wins. Be careful though, it goes down velvety but it packs a major punch.

Noble Coyote Coffee Roasters
Noble Coyote Coffee Roasters

Thank you, Steven & Dallas Observer! We regularly eat & chug from all of these artisans' wares and are very excited to be included in such a wonderful list!

Heather Rinaldi
Heather Rinaldi

These are some of my favorites, but you missed one of the city's best bites, one that graces several of these artisans' wares and many chefs' best dishes. Texas Honeybee Guild's Zip Code Honey is as local and delicious as it gets. I would pit it against any REAL (not that grocery store HFCS junk) honey in the country. Sadly, our city leaders are forgoing safe preventative measure against mosquitoes, and poisoning humans and killing bees with ineffective neurotoxic pesticide.

CitizenKane
CitizenKane

Jimmy's sausage is very good; but not as good as the sausage that use to be made at Al's (Park lane and Greenville)...now defunct....rumor is that DiCarlo worked at Al's way back when and learned the art of charcuterie from Al.

That said; I think the meats at Rudolph's are better and butchers at Rudolph's are certainly much more skilled in their sausage making (as exhibited by the variety of offerings)....also, Rudolph's ages their own beef in house and sources their beef from a single rancher in Mississippi...same can't be said for Jimmy's? ...btw, does anyone know where Jimmy's get's their beef and pork ?   Maybe Rudolph, Sysco, ????.....I have had both; and prefer Rudolph's aged steaks over Jimmy's any day !


But no doubt, Jimmy's is worthy of praise; and dallas would be poorer if it didn't exist.  Now let's just hope the owners don't go corporate chain, superstore on us !

Gipson
Gipson

There's nothing "modest" about the Hammer's hops. That's a tree in a glass. It's gorgeous looking, but I don't like it at all. I could see IPA fans loving it, of course.

Peticolas' other big one (Golden Opportunity?) is pretty good though.

brendan_j_smith
brendan_j_smith

Tree in a glass? That's barely hopped compared to anything coming out of California, Oregon or Washington State.

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