Carnitas, Barbecue and the Measure of a Great Food City: This Week In Dallas Dining

Categories: Lettuce Wrap Up

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How does Dallas rank as a food city? I ask because the Washington Post published an article this week in which Mark H. Furstenberg bitches for two pages about his city's food scene, which I typically regard as pretty great. Not New York City or San Fransisco great, but generally a pleasure to explore.

Furstenberg delves deeper than typical food commentary often does, however, pushing past popular restaurants as a measure of goodness to look at ingredient availability, affordability and tradition. It's a great read. There's a shout out to Texas-based Central Market and many other points that will resonate with Dallas-based food fans. Have you had enough of over-priced cocktailery at the hands of fancy mixoligists, for instance?

I bet you haven't had enough of Taqueria Y Carniceria Guanajuato, though. The subject of this week's review produces excellent menudo and carnitas on the weekend, and I recommend you check them out -- especially if you wake up feeling a little under the weather tomorrow.

Or you could head to Meshack's, which is undoubtedly one of the better barbecue options in the area. It even looks like a shack. And while I love the polished facade of Pecan Lodge, I have to say Meshack's beat-down exterior has some nostalgic appeal. Our resident Englishman weighs in, here.

Elsewhere in Dallas food news Leslie Brenner reviews Cafe 43 and Waters on the Eats Blog. The cafe in the new The George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum garnered two stars, while Waters earned just one. A bummer on both accounts for sure.

There's also a look at the new Dallas-based Herman Marshall distillery. Something tells me you'll be reading about the locally produced rye and bourbon here on City of Ate shortly. In fact, would you look at that clock? It's time to do a little "research."


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5 comments
liljohn
liljohn

I agree with the Post article. Dallas has the same problem. There isn't a distinctive food history here in Dallas. We bring everything in. Even the cuisine identified as Texan is from other parts of the state. We haven't pieced together a distinctive Dallas cuisine based on our culinary influences.

kergo1spaceship
kergo1spaceship

The Kergie baby (actually 4 years old) and I made tonight:

-Traditional Priazzo Pie (ricotta, Parmesan, pepperoni, basil, mozzarella)

-Pizza w/homemade dough

-Crispy BBQ Pastry (in phyllo dough with butter, shredded beef brisket, jack cheese)!

I'M FULLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLL!

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