Texans Make Scotch Whiskey Better Than the Scots Do

Categories: Drink This

Texas Whiskey Balcones.jpg
Shame on us for not seeing this sooner. A Waco distillery whooped up on the Scots in the whiskey distillin' business a month ago. They won Best in Glass, a recent whiskey competition, beating names I'm sure you'll recognize like Macallan and Glenmorangie, just to name two.

See also:
- Texas Distillers Look to Make Their Mark in Whiskey World
- Texas Craft Liquor Makers Belly Up to the Bar to Challenge Kentucky Bourbon

The New York Times used the award as hook for an article that explores new trends in American Malt Whiskey. (Even typing that feels weird.)

While spirits distilled from corn (bourbon) and rye (rye) have dominated American whiskey production, malts have slowly been gaining prominence, recently garnering attention on a word stage. Steve McCarthy, an Oregon-based distiller who makes a peaty single malt that bears his own name, says he gets calls from Japan requesting his entire inventory. Hopefully most of these whiskeys stay right here at home.

Balcones Distillery's single malt boasts "mellow notes of sautéed pears and ripe fruit mixed with a lingering toasty malt character," according to tasting notes listed on their website. With any luck we'll have some tasting notes here on City of Ate in the coming weeks.


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7 comments
Ayerightthenmate
Ayerightthenmate

If it's Whiskey with an E It's Irish Whiskey, If it's Spelled Whisky it's Scottish. Calling Scotch "WhiskEy" is like a criminal offense here in Scotland, if Texans think they make better Scotch than Scotland, why aren't they getting millions of tourists a year purposely coming just to get Cases of Whisky, what a sad article this really is. Scottish people brought Moonshine and the right to bare arms in the USA when the first settlers landed show some respect and stop disrespecting the country that shaped the culture and way of life in Southern states, I have been America twice New York and Texas and Texans and Southern Americans are without question the kindest and most welcoming people. 

jasonleestone
jasonleestone

the Scots might disagree, and vehemently too, about this article - even with the Best in Glass award. maybe it's not a matter of what's best or worse - both drinks are just different. and it's all a matter of preference. if you made your own whiskey using your own whiskey still from http://www.whiskeystill.net/ , im sure you'd think that your product is just as good as the commercial ones. "Texans make Scotch whiskey" -- did I just hear William Wallace turn over in his grave?

edwilley3
edwilley3

@Ayerightthenmate It doesn't taste anything like Scottish whisky (grain or malted barley). While I generally would not prefer Balcones over the many very good single malts in my collection (and i have better stuff than many Scots), I will say that Chip Tate has done a terrific job building this business from nothing with his own two hands. I do enjoy the Texas Single Malt, but even better are some barrels in his warehouse. His quality is improving steadily and - mark my words - there are some mighty fine casks in his warehouse that will amaze consumers one day. I am happy to support a local, family business focused on making unique, non-industrial whiskey. The real shame is in Scotland, where the likes of Macallan have not been able to keep up with demand and now release bottles that are a pale shadow of their past. Diageo, Remy, and Glenmorangie PLC have totally converted the Scottish whisky industry into a marketing factory. The nearest equivalent of Balcones in Scotland probably is Kilchoman, a distillery that I am growing to love. I recently acquired a wonderfully delicious bourbon cask that I can't wait to finish! I will see Chip tomorrow here in Addison, Texas. I am really looking forward to the evening.

edwilley3
edwilley3

@primi_timpano It's not a peated malt. "SIngle malt" doesn't necessarily mean that a whisk(e)y has any peat in the process. Rather, it indicates the type of grain that went into it and also indicates that no neutral grain spirit (i.e. vodka) was added to the barley alcohol.

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