Five Spots Where You Can Get Some Great Oysters In Dallas

Categories: Eat This

Rex's East Dennis Bay.JPG
East Dennis Bay Oysters at Rex's Seafood
Earlier this summer a bad plate of oysters at Acme F&B left a bad taste in my mouth. Poorly shucked oysters at Chesterfield left me feeling burned, too.

At nicer restaurants, oysters from northern waters can run up to $3 a shell and when they aren't perfect they can be a big disappointment. A few other less than optimal experiences had me wondering if a lot of these places should leave oyster shucking to the specialists. This fall, though, I've been eating some amazing oysters around Dallas.

Boulevardier has gotten a lot of attention for their raw bar and it's deserved. They sell a rotating selection of northern oysters at $2.50 a shell, including Tatamagouche, Cape Spear, Shoregasm, Wellfleet's and more.

Tried and True has some great Barnstables on their menu right now. The oysters are firm and meaty, with a strong briny flavor and cost $16 for half a dozen.

Rex's consistently has great oysters at great prices. In addition to the East Dennis Bay oysters they always feature, they're carrying briny Beausoleils from New Brunswick, mild and creamy Lucky Limes with their emerald green shells and Moonstone oysters from Rhode Island. All of these oysters are mild tasting and great for people who are new to raw oyster eating.

Want to shuck your own? TJ's Seafood on Oak Lawn Avenue will send you home with a dozen Salutation Cove oysters from Prince Edward Island, or Chatham Bay oysters from Massachusetts $18.99. You can also order a dozen of either to eat in the restaurant for $24.

Are you a Southerner at heart? I've been eating some great oysters from the Gulf at Dodie's on Greenville Avenue. At $12 dollars a dozen they're a great value play.


Location Info

Boulevardier

408 N. Bishop Ave., Dallas, TX

Category: Restaurant

Tried and True

2405 N. Henderson Ave., Dallas, TX

Category: Restaurant

Rex's Seafood Market

5200 W. Lovers Lane, Dallas, TX

Category: General

TJ's Seafood Market

11661 Preston Rd, Dallas, TX

Category: Restaurant


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20 comments
gabe48
gabe48

For the freshest oysters, go to T.J.s Seafood's new location on Oaklawn @ Herschel.  Don't miss their lobster roll with 1 pound of fresh, NOT frozen, lobster, it's divine.

EANB
EANB

I wish restaurants in the Dallas area would make the chargrilled oysters like at Drago's in New Orleans.  Those things are delicious, although I have no idea where those oysters come from.

NewsDog
NewsDog

I know it's not in Dallas, but I like Fish Shack up in Plano. Every time I've had oysters there they were fresh.  

Myrna.Minkoff-Katz
Myrna.Minkoff-Katz topcommenter

I dunno.  The thought of slurping on "fresh" oysters in the prairie makes me nervous.

mavdog
mavdog topcommenter

You should visit Oceanaire, great selection of fresh oysters.

 

although now that Landry's has taken over Oceanaire, you'd better hurry before Landry's screws them up.

NotAFoodie
NotAFoodie

Disagree with the "deserved" attention for Boulevardier's raw bar.  While their shellfish purveyor is indeed a fine one, that weird wooden box filled with ice doesn't exactly yell "sanitary and safe raw oyster storage to me."  

molsson
molsson

scott, i recommend reading "Sex, Death and Oysters" by Robb Walsh, a Houston writer/food critic. It's a fascinating read and will only endear one to oysters, and their varieties even more. He's also a fantastic writer. His other good book, Texas BBQ Cookbook, is also a must-read for anyone interested in food, but also bbq and Texas, in general. Both have been highly influential at how I look at food, place, etc.

Twinwillow
Twinwillow

Nothing wrong with the oysters at Pappadeaux on Oak Lawn or, Seafood Shack. Good Texas gulf oysters at much lower prices.

Scruffygeist
Scruffygeist

 @mavdog Landry's has owned them for at least 2 years now. Their oyster bar is impressive though.

scott.reitz
scott.reitz moderator

 @NotAFoodie you should see how they're stored before they get to the restaurant.

scott.reitz
scott.reitz moderator

 @molsson I know Robb Walsh. I don't know of any restaurants in Dallas that cite a specific appellation for their gulf oysters. You'll see oysters from Main penned to a specific bay, but gulf oysters (at least at the restaurants I've had them at in Dallas) describe them by state at best.

 

http://robbwalsh.com/2011/02/gulf-oysters-by-place-name/

 

Boulevardier offers gulf oysters, but they're just called "Gulf" and they're cheap. Meanwhile the northern oysters go by Luscious Limes and Shoregasm. Walsh has been pushing for better classification and I think that could help change perception, but all the trendy restaurants in Dallas don't bother with it yet. Casual restaurants like Dodies, Pappadeaux and S&D don't either.

 

I'm coming to really like gulf oysters, but it would be nice if I could order them by characteristics such as salinity and texture. Right now its a crap shoot six shells at a time.

 

 

 

 

primi_timpano
primi_timpano topcommenter

@Twinwillow I second the Seafood Shack. Their gulf oysters are the best of that type I have encountered. I've had dozens, never had a bad one, and have been consistently surprised at the briny flavor.

reverendvelvet
reverendvelvet

 @Twinwillow Texas gulf oysters in the oyster world are the equivalent of iceberg lettuce in the lettuce world. Boring and Bland.

NotAFoodie
NotAFoodie

 @scott.reitz I have. That's not the point.  You and I might know better but 99% of the public doesn't.  Bottom line: the selection is good-but-not-killer, and the presentation is questionable.  The raw bar at Boulevardier looks like a jerry-rig I'd expect to see at Pop's Fish Shack on the Galveston Seawall.

beda50
beda50

 @reverendvelvet  @Twinwillow

 Have to disagree; I had some really delicious ones at Acme and Pappadeaux this past February; just waiting until I'm sure the oysters are as big and fat as those before I try them again.

scott.reitz
scott.reitz moderator

 @NotAFoodie I checked up on this. The box is made of copper and lined with stainless steel. I would think that would make a perfectly sanitary proving ground for soon to be shucked oysters.

scott.reitz
scott.reitz moderator

 @NotAFoodie I thought I remembered a wooden box lined with stainless steel. Maybe the ice had that covered when you were there. I'll look into it.

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