Restaurant Week: Are You Getting A Great Deal?

Categories: Food News

restaurant week.jpg
Restaurant week is about to wrap up, or is half over depending on how you look at it. The promotion named after its duration has become a bit of a misnomer as restaurants expand it into what might more accurately be described as restaurant month.

Back in July, when restaurants announced participation and released menus, we offered up a list of options we thought presented he best bang for your buck. At the same time Leslie Brenner picked apart 15 menus and determined that many of the deals offered by participating restaurants weren't much of a bargain at all.

As both a critic and previously as a civilian eater, I've typically avoided offers like these because they feel watered down. Meals seem rushed, the waitstaff seems stressed, and extra charges like that foie gras supplement and extra truffle shaving have a tendency to push dinner tickets right back up where they might be on a normal night out. Who am I to turn down a slice of duck liver for a 15 extra bucks?

I'm not a civilian diner, though, and I've spent my week in the suburbs, eating jerk chicken, oxtails and meat pies like a mad man. So I'm leaving this one to you guys. How's your restaurant week going so far? How's the service, the food you're being offered and how do you feel when you walk out the door after your meal? Is restaurant week a good deal? Or does it feel like a stunt to get diners out and dining during what is typically a very slow month for the industry?

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16 comments
c2hubbard
c2hubbard

Second year of participating in Restaurant Week, which conveniently coincides with our anniversary. This year's experience at @Campo's in Oak Cliff was vastly superior to last year's at @Charlie Palmer's. Campo's ResWk menu was more imaginative, much better prepared and a better value. We wisely chose to include the additional wine pairing fee, so while we paid more than last year at Charlie Palmer's, we had a much better dining experience for our dollar. 

 

 

SatisfiedCustomer
SatisfiedCustomer

I hit up Mortons last night and was quite satisfied.  The quality of service was high and the food was great.  Throwing in the Central Market 4th course meant that I got 4 courses for the price of 1 entree.  My wife and I would definitely go again.

opinionatedguest
opinionatedguest

@ Scott, why not mention how restaurant week works and give credit to the restaurants that actually take the leap and participate? Assuming you have the contacts in restaurants, you should disclose what it cost to participate. The fixed price is $35.00, from there the restaurant gives back $7. to the North Texas Food Bank then deduct another $1. per guest that goes back to open table. From the $27, deduct food cost of a minimum 26% , labor cost 28%, and operations at another 29%. After these deductions the restaurant will net if lucky a massive $4.36 per seat. Just do some homework next time, calling it a stunt without disclosing the cost to do this is irresponsible to the industry you and your employer seek business from.

 

And some of these restaurants are doing a nice job in my opinion, not all go Sysco.

Americano
Americano

It's not called "Free Food Week".  It's smaller portions at a discounted price, and a donation to charity.  Why do people think it's a "something for nothing" deal?  Food, and service in a nice restaurant isn't free, although our society tells us everyday that it should be.  Consider it a donation to a good cause and leave it at that.

foodbiatch
foodbiatch

Got a great value at Charlie Palmer at lunch today. Just two courses would have cost more than the $25 price tag, but we got key lime pie as well. PIE wins.

aynsleyt
aynsleyt

I will always be an avid supporter of Restaurant Week.  However, I have seen a decline in quality and portion size over the past 3-4 years, which makes me sad.  I agree with a lot of what Leslie Brenner has to say in her article (linked above), but at the end of the day it is a good cause for the North Texas Food Bank.  Oh, and Abacas was amazing as always!

eleventeen
eleventeen

it is for a good cause, and it put asses in the seats.

ChrisYu
ChrisYu

good or bad, it does benefit the North Texas Food Bank.

beda50
beda50

 @foodbiatch

 Have to disagree.  I ate at Charlie Palmer on Wednesday for lunch: tomato soup, scottish salmon, key lime pie; after tea, tax and dessert my bill was $36.  Not exactly a good deal (although the salmon was delicious, would have appreciated a larger portion).

J_A_
J_A_

 @ChrisYu No one cares, they just want a cheaper meal from a fancy place. Also, they gotta check in on some social app or else it's like it never happened.

foodbiatch
foodbiatch

 @beda50 My half of the bill was $27.06. No drink. You had a $9 iced tea? Tell me tip was also in there...

foodbiatch
foodbiatch

 @beda50 Right. Except it's not meant to be an inexpensive lunch. It's meant to be a good lunch with a built-in donation to charity. And if you do the math beforehand, you can decide whether it's too expensive in advance, so you won't have to complain about it later. :) 

beda50
beda50

 @foodbiatch

 so lunch cost you $33 including tip?  my lunch was $3 more  because i  had tea.  like i said, almost $40, that's an expensive lunch.  (the prix fixe lunch was $25.)

foodbiatch
foodbiatch

 @beda50 Actually you wrote "tea, tax and dessert." It's right up there, where you wrote it.

Yes I left a tip. I'm not some sort of asshole. ;) I said my half of the bill was $27.06. I tipped $6.

beda50
beda50

 @foodbiatch

 I said that that was my bill after tea, tax and tip.  did you not leave a tiip? when i say how  much  a mea cost mel, i always include the total bill, including tip.

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