The Meat Industry is Having a Pink Slime Summit in Dallas

Categories: Food News

AMI expo.JPG
Janet Riley, a spokeperson for the American Meat Institute, says LFTB is a good thing.
The American Meat Institute has stepped up its support for Lean Finely Textured Beef, aka Pink Slime, and yesterday the group announced a summit on the subject at its annual expo. Which, it just so happens, will be held in Dallas.

After Beef Products Inc, the largest supplier of LFTB, took out a full page ad in the Wall Street Journal extolling the virtues of Pink Slime, the AMI launched a campaign to help save the product's reputation.

The organization published videos on You Tube explaining innocuous nature of the components and processes that are used to manufacture meat paste, and issued statements outlining their support of the product. The expo will try to build on that effort.

A description in the email announcing the meeting says the summit will attempt to set the record straight on what the organization is calling an unwarranted food scare. Talks will also discuss economic impacts, food science, regulatory implications, media coverage and its impact on not only LFTB but the meat and poultry industry.

Similar coverage on mechanically separated chicken had a fraction of the impact on the meat industry that the pink slime coverage did.


Sponsor Content

My Voice Nation Help
17 comments
kristimg
kristimg

You don't have to treat other cuts of meat with ammonia because the pathogens live on the surface and are killed when you bake, fry, grill. etc....  That is why you can have rare beef, but you need to cook hamburger to 160 degrees.  All ground beef is notorious for potential bacteria because grinding it creates more surface area for the bacteria to grow.  What BPI does is administer the ammonia as a gas to raise the pH.  That gas disipates quickly so you never eat it and they immediately freeze the product as well as an extra kill step for pathogens.

twinwillow
twinwillow

You know, possibly, if they called it something other than"Pink Slime"?

primi timpano
primi timpano

Just watched the video.  Complete bullshit, especially the claim that pink slime is humane because it reduces the number of slaughtered animals.  There is nothing humane about a slaughter house.

My question is that if all this citric acid and ammonia is necessary to kill bacteria from these "trimmings" why is not required for any ther parts of the animal?

From the Humane Society:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v...

primi timpano
primi timpano

The problem with the slime is that has never been properly labeled.  Allowing burgers with it to be called "all-beef" is an outright deception.  And yes, there are a lot of strange brews out there in the all beef world, but they usually state they contain beef by products.  The slime problem is the producer hid behind the "all beef" label when it had no relationship to what the average person considers to be beef.  You can fool all of the people some of time . . .but now they are reaping their own whirlwind.

Sally
Sally

Thank you to the AMI!  I appreciate your support!  I hope that people are willing to get educated about this product. It is nice to see someone who is knowledgeable about LFTB speak about it.

Whitney Filloon
Whitney Filloon

This whole PR campaign effort has been impressive, yet also completely transparent.  Can't wait to see what clever signs the picketers will come up with.

Also, did you know that corn syrup is the same as cane sugar?!  I learned that from a TV commercial last night put out by the friendly corn growers of America.  Whee.

jdub1772
jdub1772

All they have to do is label the product so consumers know what they are eating/purchasing. Let the market determine if there is a demand for the stuff. If I have a choice I will avoid the product but there is nothing wrong with offering a low cost ground beef option for those who don't care.

Titus Groan
Titus Groan

Sorry AMI.  A basic ingredient shouldn't need a name four words long, nor should it need a spokesperson. 

primi timpano
primi timpano

 So why are they not spraying the citric acid and ammonia on the ground beef?

mark zero (Jason)
mark zero (Jason)

Maybe we got a hint of the answer in the last article, where the local rancher-butcher said some of the recovered meat was from around the backbone?

mark zero (Jason)
mark zero (Jason)

Compare the fructose of HFCS to that of agave nectar for a surprise.

primi timpano
primi timpano

 Well, it is all converted to glucose.  And was that a grower ad or Archers Daniel?

kristimg
kristimg

I agree people should chose to eat what they want, however, since the grocery stores announced they were no longer selling it, how are we supposed to make that choice?

kristimg
kristimg

Do you mean the "regular" ground beef makers?  It is not required for them to do so.  The reason being is that the trim they use (as well as the BPI trim)  has been USDA inspected, however, all meat sellers recommend cooking ground beef to 160 degrees to be sure of the safety of it.  Beef Products use the extra precaution to ensure their product is safe.  BPI actually samples every single box they produce before leaving the factory.  That is why there has never been a single illness traced back to them.

mark zero (Jason)
mark zero (Jason)

Not all groceries said that, I think. Besides, I'll bet it probably still shows up in things like potted meat.

I agree, if there's nothing wrong with it, then they shouldn't have to conceal it. Label it.

Now Trending

From the Vault

 

Loading...