Uncle Uber's Has Deep Ellum's Best Sandwich, and is Poised To Dominate Dallas

Categories: Whimsy

Uber.jpg
Comments come in many forms, and this one fluttered in on a twitter stream. Within a day of the sort-of-soft opening, the foodnicks were chattering about Deep Ellum's new sandwich shop, Uncle Uber's (2713 Commerce St.). Twitter user @imccanntx laid down the gauntlet shortly after we posted a quick look on City of Ate:

I'd like to hear @scottreitz's take on the Uncle Uber "sammich" bread. Looks good, and good for @deepbusiness:

@imccanntx had obviously read my previous rant on Dallas' abysmal sandwich scene, and wanted to see how Uber's loaves stacked up.

It took me a week to get down there, but I visited for lunch today, and I have to say, based on two sandwiches and some decent fries, the 'hood that used to host Dallas' bustling jazz scene now has itself a decent sandwich shop.

The pork sandwich I tried was a little lifeless -- old Uncle Uber should think about a spicy cider vinegar sauce to play off that crunchy slaw. My shaved rib-eye, however, was a solid base hit, pairing juicy, savory meat with funky blue cheese and sweet caramelized onions. I was visibly upset that they didn't offer a cold cut Italian option. If they procured some high quality cold cuts, they'd have a shot at this city's best hoagie.

And about that bread:

Not bad. Uber's is a sturdy roll with a decent crust, but the crustiness isn't quite as intense as it could be. I like when my sandwich leaves a mess in my lap. I asked the girl working the counter where they got their rolls, and an hour or so later I was on the horn with O.J. DeSouza, a third generation baker at Signature Bakery in Dallas.

The DeSouzas hail from Goa, India, of all places, and have been banging out breads in the Big D for the past 33 years. O.J. described working with Uncle Uber's Bryan and Kathy Crelly to develop the custom baked roll. "Crusty Hoagie" was the original request, but the rolls, when split and grilled, had a tendency to separate into two halves -- a major no-no in the sandwich world.

DeSouza reworked things a little and changed the recipe to increase the pliability of the bread. This is the characteristic that's robbed me of the crustiness I still haven't found in Dallas. Still, this is definitely some of the better sandwich bread I've tried since arriving, though I still have to run the banh mi circuit.

I'm not the only one who's noticed Signature Bakery's skills with a deck oven. The Texas State Fair will be featuring their bread for hot dogs hamburgers and other snacks, according to DeSouza. He's also working with some other sandwich shops in town. Could Dallas be on the cusp of a blossoming hoagie culture?


Follow City of Ate on Facebook & Twitter. Follow me at @scottreitz



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30 comments
Mena
Mena

Thats my freakin sandwich! I LOVE IT!

Louise
Louise

Tried it.  The turkey sandwich was the most vile concoction I have ever smelled -- and it smelled rotten.  The meat stank, and the few bites I managed to choke down tasted of chemicals.  Avoid this place like the plague!

Ralphy
Ralphy

No link to "Uncle Ubers", no prices, no discussion of sourcing for their sandwich meats, no nuttin...lazy lazy lazy review Mr. Reitz.

Gipson
Gipson

I always love to have more options down by Trees and the other concerts venues. I'm sure I'll check this out pre-show before too long.

Travis Rex
Travis Rex

I tried the shaved ribeye last week.  Loved the bread and yeah it would have been awesome if it was toasted.  I would have liked it much better is there had been a bit more lettuce and tomato, no to mention having a bit of jous.  It was a bit dry, albeit tasty and worth trying again.

Kergo 1 Spaceship
Kergo 1 Spaceship

This is a good looking sandwich-salute'.  As the DO voice of reason, I approve this message!

Nick R.
Nick R.

I want to write a hard-boiled detective novel called "The Banh Mi Circuit"

Chris Danger
Chris Danger

I went to Uncle Ubers last friday after work. The food was great, Bryan and Kathy have a real winner here. This is the type of business Ellum needs (i.e. something original and not pizza, BBQ or Tex-Mex), I hope this is the beginning of more restaurants opening down here that offer a variety of amazing food...

matt
matt

not everyone likes your type of roll.  this isnt lets see how close dallas can get to philly.  we have our own food culture.  i would rather eat my sammy - not wear it

mantikos
mantikos

Haha good to Indians with baking skills :)

Frank
Frank

Weird! I had the Turkey sandwich and found it amazing on the buttered / toasted sour dough bread and loaded w/ bacon.

Kergo 1 Spaceship
Kergo 1 Spaceship

Dallas is a soulless s.hole  for food culture and creativity-nuff said? Redneck hell?

Scott Reitz
Scott Reitz

I'm aware there are regional differences in bread prefrence. Someone from San Francisco would find a Sarcone roll from Philly lifeless. An Old Word baker would find NYC bread laughable, and I bet if you ate the bread served on a table in Rome you would find it bland and in need of salt.

Each of these breads has distinct characteristics that help define the baking culture of that city. And I'd be willing to wager that most would have a difficult time describing Dallas' bread scene as a whole with any defining characteristics. How would you describe the bread culture here? What loaf defines Dallas?

At Uncle Uber's, a sandwich shop set out to capture another region's bread, and they're off to a good start. Until Dallas can find it's own bread identity I think other sandwich shops would do well to follow suit. That's not to say every sandwich shop in the loop should conjure the Pennsylvania Hoag -- there's a whole world from which a sandwich maker can draw inspirations.

Jon Daniel
Jon Daniel

" we have our own food culture". Umm  -no you don't. The only local sandwich chain is great outdoors

Chris Danger
Chris Danger

Scott, The main challenge in Dallas is theres no true "legacy/multi generational" bakeries that specialize in bread as you would find in cities on the east/west coast or Midwest. There's days id love a great sandwich on potato bread, philly-style hoag or real marble rye, its going to take more people like the DeSouza's getting into the baking business and a commitment from business in this region to purchase that product accordingly.

Kergo 1 Spaceship
Kergo 1 Spaceship

Too much bullshit asshole!  Get back to work at the check out stand at Walmart-breaktime is over.

eam0061
eam0061

I always thought tortillas was the bread of Dallas. Corn, flour, blistered, steamed, grilled, raw, blue, red....etc etc. I know more about tortillerias than I do bakeries. Hm.

Kergo 1 Spaceship
Kergo 1 Spaceship

he he...check out my fine work on Sporto.......I am SPORTO; the great KERGIE.

Coleman
Coleman

he's a troll who occasionally escapes the sports blog.

Kergo 1 Spaceship
Kergo 1 Spaceship

I'm Kergo, the colonial gubner, sent to make sure ya'll (the natives) don't act up.  Thank god we took over; otherwise ya'll'd (Texas speak) still be living in earthen huts and wearin' coon skin hats.  

PlanoDave
PlanoDave

Bread?  Bread is what Dallas needs?  Really?  Bread?

Scott Reitz
Scott Reitz

D.C. almost had a bread culture without the legacy you describe Chris. Local bakeries had embraced old world techniques, but were then squashed when Whole Foods came to town. It was too much trouble to stop by the bakery after the grocery store, and so, the Nation's Capital went the way of frozen, par baked bread.

Still a smaller movement pushed on, and a collective of bakeries continued banging out baugs in the Old World style. They were championed by Mark Furstenberg and they made great loves.

I think that's what Dallas needs most. A total bread freak who's well traveled and can push Dallas to embrace the crustier, sour, more well developed loaves of the Old World. These breads don't make for great sandwiches always, but they do demonstrate what makes for good baking -- something that can only have a positive effect on the bakeries that produce the breads that make it into sandwich shops all over the city.

Scott Reitz
Scott Reitz

Dallas definitely has tacos. I've eaten so many since coming here. Fancy tacos (this weeks review) road side tacos (tongue with taste buds still attached) and gas station tacos.

I wonder what it would take to turn Dallas into a nationally recognized, taco town.

Jeffsyoga
Jeffsyoga

Great American Hero has the absolute worst sandwiches in Dallas - They Microwave virtually everything , even the bread , what a disgrace.

Jon Daniel
Jon Daniel

No I mean ones that make edible food

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