A Spoonful Of Honey May Not Keep Your Allergies Down, But It's Tasty Enough To Try

Categories: Whimsy

honey.jpg
I've been eying the weather channel a lot lately. Not for the temperature, but for the pollen count, which apparently will begin an upward march as soon as the mercury begins to wane and the fall allergy season kicks off. Allergies aren't good for food critics, as you might have heard.

I've never had a problem with histamines. If it were edible, I'd probably be making ragweed salads with a dusting of oak pollen as I laughed in the face of a malady I don't understand. But I'm starting to worry. Every time I make a joke about Texas allergies, faces shift. The tone in the room becomes more somber. People tell me I've never seen pollen like this before. I'm getting scared.

Honey producers respond to my fear by cheering the homeopathic properties of local honey all over their marketing materials. North Dallas Honey is a local honey producer that makes such claims. Their web site has a cut-and-paste from a Discovery Fit and Health web page. What they fail to cut and paste from the same article is an important fact:

There have been no peer-reviewed scientific studies that have conclusively proven whether honey actually reduces allergies.

A double-blind trial won't change the immunization properties of honey. If it works, it works. A formal study would, however, firm up the claims that a lot of producers are simply leveraging to sell more of their products. Thankfully honey is pretty cheap, and I'm willing to gamble on the health claims if only because it's tasty. My only problem is finding the most fun way to take my daily dosage.

Should I spread bread with butter, before a healthy honey drizzle? Or should more stoically stir a bit into a cup of green tea? Or maybe a young, slightly sexier Mary Poppins look-a-like will administer my daily dose directly from a spoon. She could even whistle that ridiculous tune. Whatever she wants, as long as it keeps my tastebuds alive and well.

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7 comments
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Storm_71
Storm_71

I always thought those wooden things people use to serve honey where weird. Is it just me??

Margie Hubbard
Margie Hubbard

When you can write your name in the layer of pollen that's covering your car... then you'll know what it's like here.  If it hits you bad, forget the honey.  24 hour allergy relief is in order. 

Grumpy Demo
Grumpy Demo

Best of luck, after about ten years in Texas I developed a pollen allergy, the good news about  ten years later I seem to have grown out of it. Allegra, baby, allegra.

The Mountain Cedar pollen got one critic, hope not another. Don't forget to change your HVAC filter about twice as often as recommended, 3M makes a good one.

Cheerybitch
Cheerybitch

Guess we need to do that. Allergies have been kicking my ass for the past week. I was *thisclose* to bathing in local honey.

Bob Dobbsson
Bob Dobbsson

It's true people who have never suffered allergies before, do so here. A Dr once told me, "live here long enough and you'll get allergies." I looked into the honey/allergy claim when I developed allergies and there doesn't appear to be any scientific validation. All evidence seems to be purely anecdotal. On the other hand local honey is mighty tasty, you don't get much more local than Zip Code Honey etc, and it's better for you than any of the human processed sweeteners available.

stephen
stephen

in addition, common sense should make the pollen for allergies silly. Pollen used in honey is from plants pollinated by *bees*... not the pollen blowing around in the wind.  you're wind pollinated plants make you sneeze. 

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