Take Heart, Butter-Cream Lovers, a New Law Could Set You Free

Categories: Food News

home baker.jpg
Bethany Davila
Home bakers will no longer be outlaws if Governor Rick Perry doesn't veto a new bill allowing them to sell their goods.
It's a beautiful thing when elected legislative officials take cues from their constituents and act on them. That's how state government functions, right? People need or want a change in regard to a particular issue, so they start calling their senators or representatives, who then draw up the plans, debate with their peers and maybe make a law.

Hah. Just kidding.

Nevertheless, last Friday, for all of us who love butter cream icing, things took a turn for the better.

Many probably don't realize that currently bake sales are mafia-esque operations where only cops with a sweet tooth can be bribed. And your aunt who makes wedding cakes on the side? She's a crook. See, in Texas you can't sell anything made in a home kitchen, although that could change since Senate Bill 81 passed by both the Texas House and Senate last week. Sections 5 and 6 of this measure clears the way for bakers across the state to come out of the dark, murky shadows and sell their goods legally.

The bill stipulates that as long as their gross annual income stays below $50,000, home bakers can sell non-potentially hazardous "baked goods" including cookies, cakes, breads, pies, etc. Local health departments do not have the jurisdiction to regulate these home cottage food operations, but they must maintain a record of any complaints made. And the bakers are required to label all of their foods with their name, address and a statement that the food was made in a home kitchen that has not been inspected by a health department.

And, lastly, the product cannot be bought over the Internet. This specifically means the home bakers can't set up an online shopping cart and let people purchase blindly. Websites can still be used to promote and operate a business, but the essence of this clause is to ensure this is a cottage business where locals interact face-to-face, in the true spirit of the bill.

Representative Lois Kolkhorst (R-Brenham) became the biggest supporter of the effort and filed House Bill 2084, which eventually died but was later woven into SB 81.

"I filed House Bill 2084 not just as a public health bill, but as a public freedom bill," explained Kolkhorst, who chairs the House Committee on Public Health. "I'm charged with overseeing laws that affect our health and safety. But as a lawmaker, I'm also trying to stop America's slide into an authoritarian society, where we're afraid of government stepping in to regulate every aspect of life, including our own food choices."

On the baking front, Kelley Masters has waged a tireless effort to promote the cottage food measure since being told she couldn't start her own home cake business back in 2006. Blogging about the matter she wrote, "In a society that values freedom and entrepreneurship, a cottage food law is both necessary and moral."

Through the Facebook page "Texas Baker's Bill" she and other organizers amassed nearly 3,500 followers who have been treated to a re-education of the complicated and often silly legislative process required to pass a bill.

"This bill will let people with a talent for baking or decorating cakes and cookies create their own jobs," said Masters. "It also promotes local foods and entrepreneurship."

Unfortunately this bill does have some opposition, and Governor Rick Perry hasn't signed it yet. Some health departments, like Harris County's (Houston), had explicit concerns about health risks and lobbied against it. Hours before Kolkhorst took the podium for the final vote, Harris County lobbyists proposed amendments. Being a rural lawmaker, the Brenham legislator knew she had to strongly consider their requests since it was a risk to face-off with and urban delegation who could have recruited other urban lawmakers to defeat the bill.

Harris County's Director of Legislative Relations, Cathy Sisk, said, "In the end we were happy with the final wording of the bill for the most part."

Sisk explained that there were two stipulations in the bill that led to the compromise for health officials. The first was that all packaging must include a statement that the product was baked in an uninspected home kitchen. And the second was banning Internet sales.

This touches on the leading free market principle of caveat emptor, which means, "Let the buyer beware." On the flip side this term carries with it the concept that the buyer should get to decide from whom they purchase a product and assume any risks associated with that purchase, without interference of government. As for the assumed risk, the cottage food bill is only for non-hazardous food and requires specific labeling.

The governor has three choices now that the bill resides on his desk: sign it, which make it law; ignore it, which also makes it law; or veto it, which means everyone starts all over again next year session.

Requesting anonymity since the law isn't official yet, a clandestine cupcake baker in Dallas explained what this means to her.

"If this bill passes it will help many families like mine make the extra cash we need to get through tough times," she said. "My work is great and people have no problem buying from my kitchen. Home bakers should not have to live in fear of being shut down when everyone involved in the transaction is aware and satisfied."

Texas home bakers are literally sitting at home with eggbeaters ready to whirl. Governor Perry has to sign the bill within 20 days of it being passed. Then, hopefully, on September 1, 2011, the day the bill will be enacted, they'll all be legit.

Scrolling through the Texas Baker's Bill Facebook page, it sounds dramatic, but their livelihoods are literally at stake. And they're not asking for a hand out; they just want to work.

Follow City of Ate on Twitter: @cityofate.
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69 comments
Rhparsley
Rhparsley

 Actually, there is recourse in the law. The health department can keep a list of complaints of home bakers...the law does not prevent civil action against a person if the food makes you sick and you can prove it.

Rhparsley
Rhparsley

 I know this reply is a year after the original comment; however, I wanted to put this on the record for others who are researching. The off hour time starts at 10 pm...not a time when most home bakers can leave their families to go bake cookies or cakes. Secondly, the place requires a $250 deposit, $50 is non refundable; 3rdly, they require a manager's certificate; 4thly, they require current liability insurance which is also several hundred dollars. All of this puts this out of the hands of the small at home baker who makes cookies for the kid's home room or tries to make a couple hundred dollars a month to keep the family afloat. This might be an option for a person who is getting together the resources to open a store front, but that does not relate to most home bakers who bake the occasional wedding cake or shower cake. I have done this over the years for family and friends. Getting sick from a baked cakes is far less likely than getting sick from a chicken salad sandwich from the local grocery store deli. Be reasonable.

Porkrod69
Porkrod69

Like a true hypocrite, there is no way Perry will sign this.  It would generate private revenue and remove government intrusion....and would not be outright taxed.  

Kristine Kersting
Kristine Kersting

Here is my question, Arizona just passed the same law, if you use butter in your frostings for cupcakes and cakes, is this considered a 'hazardous' food because of the animal product?  They have already said you cannot use cream cheese frosting and to get butter frosting tested is $100's of dollars- thank you-

Kristine Kersting
Kristine Kersting

So here is my question for you- Arizona has just passed the same law.  If you use real butter in   frostings on top of cupcakes and cakes, is this considered a 'hazardous food' because there is an animal product in the frosting?  They already said you can't use cream cheese frostings and to get butter in frosting tested is $100's of dollars-  thank you-

Holly
Holly

Wow! The effort we need to expend to allow Aunt Jemima and Mother Hubbard to sell home baked goods, while the oil industry is given the green flag to frack our water is astounding.  Maybe if these small businesses could change their names to EXXON or CHEVRON.  THEN, they could not only enjoy no restrictions, they could get government subsidies!  

Bit282
Bit282

Thank you for a great article!

Cupcake
Cupcake

Laura, you stated: "Now, the difference between donating to a bake sale and selling your products is simple. The baker donates to a bake sale and doesn't make a profit. The baker SELLING their products is making a profit. (and taking potential sales from a licensed business)"

Actually, from a public health perspective, the difference between a bake sale and selling your products is zero.  They are both selling a home prepared food product to the public.  Public health laws are in place, ostensibly, to protect the public health; not to protect existing businesses from competition. 

Studies have shown, as this one bears out, that inspections have no measurable effect on food safety, as long as it is the food producer who is responsible in case there is a problem.  http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/bi...  

The cottage food model is the ultimate safeguard.  The owner of the business prepares the food and is responsible in the unlikely event something goes wrong. 

Additionally, liability insurance is not required by law for restaurants.  Home bakers who operate under the radar right now are unable to obtain it, because you cannot insure an illegal business.  When SB 81 is passed into law, they will be able to protect themselves and their customers with liability insurance. 

SB 81 is a desperately needed, long overdue bill.

Laura C
Laura C

By the way, I know Sweet Sugar Belle and I couldn't be more supportive of her efforts and her talents. Establish a law that will allow home bakers to get their kitchens inspected and sell their wares.

Laura C
Laura C

As a small food business owner who has worked both out of a shared use facility and my own production facility (in TWO different states), I have a different perspective than most of the commenters. There are so many factors here, I'll try to keep my comments as short as possible.Requiring baked goods sold at Bake Sales and fundraisers to be made in a licensed kitchen is utterly ridiculous. I've never heard of such a law, either in Boston, MA or Vermont. A shared use facility is way too expensive and not always clean. The shared use facility that I used was licensed by the city, and most times was incredibly dirty. I spent half my time there cleaning before I could even start my work. At the time I left the kitchen, it was $35/hour, plus I had to pay for all my storage separately: dry goods, fridge space, freezer space. All this on a monthly basis, in addition to the hourly rate.  It's INSANE to expect a person baking for a bake sale, where they are DONATING their products to incur this kind of cost.Now, the difference between donating to a bake sale and selling your products is simple. The baker donates to a bake sale and doesn't make a profit. The baker SELLING their products is making a profit. (and taking potential sales from a licensed business)In the states that I've operated in, it IS possible to get your home kitchen licensed and SELL your products.  In MA, I rented a studio apartment specifically to ice my cookies, while still making dough and baking in the shared use kitchen. it was still expensive, but much less than paying the $35/hour (and you better hope you can get some free labor to help you cover those costs)I currently live and operate in VT, which has very liberal laws regarding home kitchens and has a HUGE cottage industry presence. I have been able to build my own production facility separate from my home, but on the same property. My initial inspection was scheduled and every year I get a surprise visit from my Health Inspector. So we have to be on our toes and following all the health codes ALL the time. Even after he shows up for his annual visit, I never know if he's going to come again.Why can't Texas let bake sales just BE and write laws where home kitchens wishing to SELL their products can be inspected, insured, and licensed? Vermont has a population of less than 600,000, and a TINY budget for these kinds of laws. If we can do it, why can't Texas?

Sweetsugarbelle
Sweetsugarbelle

That's me...in the photo.  And my kids, which is the reason I want to bake at home.  I can take care of them, contribute, but still be a mom who doesn't have to rely on expensive daycares and miss the fun stuff while I am working.

I understand the concerns of others, however, all of my former clientele (pre-being turned in days) knew me, came to my house to pick up their cookies, and were fully aware of the enviroment from which they were purchasing and were okay with it. 

My baking days are over, I stick mostly to my website now, but I hope that the future of our state doesn't include baking moms operating like criminals out of fear of the health department.  There are far worse ways to make a living, and many other more pressing matters that need our decreasing state resources.

Kimberly Chapman
Kimberly Chapman

It's a tragedy that someone of your incredible talent can't sell her wares.  Hopefully the bill will pass and you can take whatever orders you have time for.

Knitrageous
Knitrageous

It's called Freedom of Choice. If you don't feel safe eating home baked goods then don't eat home baked goods. It's as simple as that.

lynneyost
lynneyost

popular websites like printapons and retail me not has coupons for pretty much any shopping site I've gone to most of the coupons are valid drops down with coupons without me having to search for them

Lizz Clements
Lizz Clements

I think it's important for those against this bill to accept is that persons intending to sell from their at home kitchens aren't going to dupe the public into buying from them. Anyone who will potentially buy will know up front that a) these items were baked in someone's residential home and b) their health is ultimately up to them. It would enable me, for instance, to sell cupcakes to my coworkers (and hopefully their friends, and then their friends) without worrying about getting a business license until I have the money for it or a potential investor willing to provide a serious loan. Resale is not an option for bakers interested in this bill passing (except in the case of bake sales, anyway) so you won't be stopping by Austin Java and buying a scone that was made in someone's home and wholesaled out to the cafe without your knowledge. As far as I'm concerned, if you're opposed, the least you can do is to not participate. The public understands full well the ramifications of eating something made in someone's house. It's never stopped anyone at my employer's office parties from stuffing their faces full of our store director's Nestle Tollhouse brownie bars. Double chocolate chips. Absolute heaven. And, as a side note, I've only ever gotten food poisoning from corn, chicken, and green onions.

Much love!

Kimberly Chapman
Kimberly Chapman

This issue is literally about freedom, mom, and apple pie.  Right now I cannot legally donate anything to my child's school for a bake sale amidst school budgets being slashed.  That is crazy.  This bill needs to pass so people throughout Texas have the freedom to hold bake sales at schools, churches, or for other charitable endeavours.  Home sales would be nice too but nobody's ever paid me a penny because I've never asked for one and don't intend to start.  I simply want to give legally!

Leah
Leah

My girl Lauren Daniels wrote this!!! GO GIRL!!!! Super fantastic article!!! SO PROUD!!!

Julie
Julie

EXCELLENT article!  Let's hope this passes!

RPH
RPH

So as an owner of a legitimate business with insurance,licensing, sanitation and safety certification I can expect my fees to drop anda relaxation of health codes up to 50K, right?

And I can give away my product because my landlord will stopexpecting rent.

Fundraisers are one thing, but selling to the public isquite another.

I have called the governors’ office and requested a veto ofthis bill.

JimmyJay
JimmyJay

Of course you would. You see this as a threat to your "legitimate" business. There's always two sides to every argument. You'll continue to have the advantage of being a convenient stop for customers. Also, with the cap on earnings, your "competition" has limits that you don't. Unless there's 500 home bakers in your area that are just plain better than you, that is. If that's the case, then you probably would be facing problems with or without home bakers in the game.

Kimberly Chapman
Kimberly Chapman

But selling at school fundraisers is selling to the public, and that's what your phone call just tried to block.  I have never asked for penny one for any of my baked goods, but I've donated to schools and other charitable causes.  Your call just kicked those schools and charities to the curb.  Nice.

sanderw
sanderw

http://www.hourkitchendallas.c...

$16/hr non-prime time with a 10% discount for over 40 hrs / month.

Labeling it as "baked in a home kitchen" doesn't give the public the info they need to know to properly evaluate the food's safety. Also, why allow the risk when education of the bakers on how to avoid it is so easy?

JW
JW

So the bakers from Fort Worth have to drive all of the way to Garland?  It ends up costing a lot more than $16 an hour.  Anywhere in Fort Worth for $15 an hour?

CS Baker
CS Baker

Okay, so the Harris County Health Department asked for the additions to the bill.  They agreed to the language, and it was made for ALL counties, not just Harris County, which is not the county I live in.  I think the Health Department has had it's say on what will suffice and that's how it stands.  Also, just because the bill doesn't lay out the need for food handling classes, doesn't mean home bakers wont take the classes.  I for one do plan to take a food handlers class and eventually a Food Managers class.  That's because I want to be extra certain that I'm going above and beyond for my clients.  Just because the bill doesn't cover some aspects doesn't mean they weren't important to some of its supporters.  It's not rocket science to maintain a clean kitchen.

Kelley Masters
Kelley Masters

So let's do the math.  Let's say I go to my commercial kitchen at 10 p.m. (because the $16/hr rate only applies between 10 p.m. and 6 a.m.)  I bake a cake, wait for it to cool, decorate it, and leave a conservative 4 hours later.  It is now 2 a.m. and I have paid $64 to make a cake that I will probably sell for anywhere from $30 - $100.  The $64 does not include my ingredient costs.  By the time you factor those in, I've probably lost money on this cake.  How does this make sense?  And what makes a commercial kitchen so special?  I used to rent one, and the first thing I would have to do when I got there was wipe the dead bugs off the counter, then wash the dirty mixer that the person before me had left.  Sorry, your logic is out to lunch on this one.

Lorholland
Lorholland

I have gotten food poisoning three times in the last 12 months from three different restaurants not one mile from the Texas Capitol. All three are Austin institutions that have been around 20-30+ years and one is very upscale. I have never made myself or anyone else sick from food prepared in my own kitchen. So maybe those three places need to take a food handling course from me.

On The Fence
On The Fence

Yes, tainted eggwhites can cause salmonella, and a rock in a walnut could cause a physical hazard. Does the severity of the symptoms change on a sliding scale according to whether it was prepared in a restaurant, in a home kitchen & fed to family, or in a home kitchen and paid for and consumed by a neighbor?

If I am reading the bill right, the face-to-face transaction and the labeling that the amendment of the bill intends should make food-borne illness tracking easier. I would think it would take less resouces ($$$$)  to trace back to a one person cottage food producer than to figure out which one of 15 restaurant employees or which step of a factory process is the source of an illness.

That is weird that Harris County HD didn't include a food safety course in their list of demands they handed the legislators. Makes one wonder if food safety really is their motivation for fighting this. I certianly hope that the bakers that want to do this the legal way will take the initiative to take the courses even though it isn't required. The ones who don't care about the current laws and are baking & selling right now anyway, I bet they won't bother.

Dfritz54
Dfritz54

The licensing process may ensure basic education and verification of sanitation standards however it is up to the staff to comply with the sanitation standards and regulations each and every day. Because an establishment passes its health inspection on the one or two days each year it is inspected in no way represents proof of continued compliance. Asking/expecting a minimum waged employee to have the same level of integrity towards maintaining sanitation standards as the business owner is, unfortunately, unrealistic. Also, it IS reasonable to assume that an individual will take greater care in preparing foods in their personal kitchen vs. a commercial establishment. As for your "Proper equipment in place for good sanitization" comment, "proper" and "good" are relative terms. Just how many consumers end up in the ER after eating in a private home vs. a commercial restaurant? I'm going with the odds that favor better sanitation standards in a private home. We would all be shocked to see the condition of the kitchens in many of our favorite restaurants...with kitchens that have passed the required inspections. Overall, this is a great step in the right direction for Texans. No more back alley selling of cupcakes! :)

sanderw
sanderw

The only recourse I see in the bill is that the health department will make a list of reports. Do you see something I'm missing?

Lorholland
Lorholland

Especially since by the time I stopped vomiting and could even make a phone call it was two days later. So by then the HD was sure the problem was moot. Probably should have gone to the hospital that time but frankly this year I got to be an old hand at riding out e coli or whatever it was three different places gave me. Wish I could tell you which places but I dont want to get sued. Ironic.

Lorholland
Lorholland

I did and nothing was really done. Again very apologetic guy but not terribly interested. So the next two times I didn't bother.

Lorholland
Lorholland

There is little the health dept will do, in reality. I reported the first instance and nothing was done. I talked at length to the local health dept and the guy was apologetic but unwilling and enlightened me about how long food is allowed to sit and still be used. It grossed me out to find out what the state and the county deems acceptable. Things I don't do with food in my own kitchen. So air tight it is not. Laughable to think the businesses that made me sick would get investigated much less shut down. Too much time in Austin and too maconnects ruins and old money for that kind of thing. And yes the bill includes recourse for anyone made sick by a home baker.

Marie
Marie

If the person legally responsible for producing the food is also literally the same person producing the food, that changes the dynamic.  Low paid employees are less likely to be as careful and diligent as the owner would be. That's what all the control of the health dept is about. Picture all workers caring about the food preparation and quality of the product as if they were the owner. Things would be different, wouldn't they?

I've worked in restaurants and frankly I am very concerned about food born illness when eating out.  If people knew what was going on behind the scenes, it would turn their stomachs.

People are not so ignorant they don't know how to prepare safe food. Everyone does it in his home daily. But if you truly believe people are so inept, why didn't you ask for the training in the bill? Sounds like someone set a dirty trap, doesn't it? What other reason could there be? 

I feel sorry for all the bakers in Harris County, living in fear of that health dept must be pretty hell.

RPH
RPH

I hope you called the health department to fix the problem with the business you got sick from.

Judi Gaytan
Judi Gaytan

How is a bake sale different from selling to the public?

If you're worried about suddenly having more competition, and competition that hasn't had to invest the way you have to get your business started, that's understandable.  I would be worried too if I owned a bakery...but it sounds like it's a financial concern that you're cloaking as a food safety issue.  Donating two dozen cupcakes to a bake sale is no different in terms of food safety than selling two dozen cupcakes to someone...if the cupcakes were going to cause illness, the illness would exist whether the baker profited from the sale or a charity profited from the sale.

RPH
RPH

There arepaper trails to the items from farmer/fisher to end user. Tainted egg whites ina butter cream can cause an outbreak of salmonella just as a rock in a walnutcookie could cause a physical hazard.

I agree,soap and water won’t fix that.

RPH
RPH

You need sanitizer (bleach or quatinary) in a three bay sink or temperature upwards of 181, a home dishwasher would need a tubo booster.

Judi Gaytan
Judi Gaytan

Here's a list of the most serious foodborne illness outbreaks in recent history: http://www.foodpoisonjournal.c...  If you read the list, you'll notice there are no baked goods listed as causes.  Hamburger meat, radishes, even well water...but no cakes or cookies on the list.

Soap and water can't prevent foodborne illness all of the time.  It doesn't do anything for contaminated beef, for example...but this bill is not about being able to butcher cattle in your home kitchen and sell the meat.  It's about baked goods, which are low-risk.

RPH
RPH

There arerules that insure the public health safety. Fail safes and redundancies are inplace and work a good deal of the time.

An outbreakis two (2) reported illnesses from one source.

I am all forbake sales at churches and schools but not to sell to the public, the cost hasthe potential to  be catastrophic.

sanderw
sanderw

Judi -- But this bill isn't just for sales from your kitchen. It also includes selling to a lot of people who would have no relationship with the baker other than the final transaction.

Also, the fact that you've never seen something isn't proof that it's either sanitary or not so I don't understand the point. Licensing the baking process ensures that the commercial kitchens and factories are monitored and inspected for legal safety standards and that the food producers are educated on food safety. It's obviously not perfect, but it's a system that has saved countless lives.

sanderw
sanderw

If just having a sink, soap, and hot water were good enough there would be no foodborne illnesses anywhere in the US.

Judi Gaytan
Judi Gaytan

Exactly!  Any potential customer I had would see my kitchen and judge its cleanliness for themselves.  I've never seen the kitchen in the restaurants I've been to.  I've never seen the factory where the grocery store cakes are baked, before they're frozen and shipped out to the grocery stores.  Any customer that I might have in the future will sit down at my kitchen table with me to discuss their order, and pick up their cake from that same kitchen. 

Judi Gaytan
Judi Gaytan

Have you ever seen a home kitchen that was lacking a sink?  I've been washing my dishes in good ol' soap and hot water for more than 20 years, and no one has ever gotten sick from food made in my kitchen.  It doesn't take any high tech equipment to keep a kitchen clean and utensils sanitized.

Vemclure
Vemclure

If there is a complaint, the person calls the health department. In addition, the person buying from the cottage baker knows the baker and, in most cases, will be picking up the product from the home. Hmmm, when was the last time you saw the kitchen, other than in a fast food restaurant, where your food was prepared? When did you last sit down with the chef to order your dinner? Or even if you pick up cookies at the grocery store bakery, who baked them? Under what conditions? I was a sous chef and baker. Believe me, you would rather eat from my home kitchen any day than out of most commercial kitchens. And yes, that includes high end restaurants.

sanderw
sanderw

Not sure how I became a socialist. And I'd certainly like to see some verification for the stats you seem to be citing at random. Also, how do you know that all home bakers are as conscientious and knowledgeable about food safety as yourself (and have the proper equipment in place for good sanitization)?

My contention was that a licensing process ensures education and verification of sanitation standards therefore preventing foodborne illnesses. And that the barrier to entry really isn't that high with the way things are now. Additionally, with all the recent outbreaks we should be pushing for tougher legislation, not lesser.

Worthyworthy_
Worthyworthy_

sanderw,  you are creating a solution for a problem that really isn't!  That's how socialists think....you got people in positions of "theory"  who think they are smarter than everyone else and try to forecast what a potential problem that MIGHT exist in the future to protect the poor dumb sheep from themselves! This is classic socialist thinking my friend.  MOST people would rather avoid being food poisoned  in the first place....reporting a restaurant maybe be a legislated "recourse" but  avoiding such recourse  in the first place saves time and money....furthermore, your logic is half baked (excuse the pun).....you will find far FEWER cases of food poisoning from home-based bakers because the average person will make sure to clean and keep a sanitized kitchen because THEY themselves have to eat from the same utensils....not so for the  sloppy commercial vendor...they can go home and eat....but the home based baker has to eat what they sell.....

sanderw
sanderw

If you've gotten food poisoning from a licensed restaurant you need to report that to the health dept. They will do an investigation and, if it's warranted, shut down the business. There is no such recourse for a home baker.

Kandl0517
Kandl0517

Do you ever buy anything at fundraisers?  I'm pretty sure that mom didn't rent a commercial kitchen.  Ever eat anything that someone brings to work from home?

Elaine
Elaine

Ever go to a home dentist? Bake sales are a non profit driven venture ment to be once or twice a year.  

Elaine
Elaine

You realizefoodservice personnel have their hands in your food, as a dentist has theirhands in your mouth. Don't see dentists re-using un-sanitized tools andskipping the gloves any time soon or going into practice without propertraining and documentation. Sure it'sover the top. There was a time when bakers could "enrich" bread withsawdust? There's alaw prohibiting that now.

As long as we can discuss openly issues that we disagree on, our country is doing pretty well!

 

Christy
Christy

Except some overzealous Texas counties won't even let us have a bake sale without having everything prepared in a commercial kitchen.  By the time I buy the ingredients, pay for the kitchen, packaged everything, get my permit - there's no way I can recoup what I've paid out, let alone actually raise any money for the non-profit I'm a part of.

And didn't the previous bill that was shelved have licensing/certification requirements - if that's the true argument, why couldn't that one go through?  And what makes Texas baked goods more toxic than other states? Many states have cottage food laws - where's the stories of deadly chocolate chip cookies and e coli cakes?  What about Mrs. Baird - how many people did she kill in 1908?  I'm sure she didn't have the cleaners, special dishwasher, three bay sink...  Give me a break!

I can see why storefront business owners might be scared - but if you have a good product, you shouldn't worry about standing behind it.  

Elaine - the dentist comment is idiotic.  You do realize a dentist is a doctor who does procedures - including surgery- on people, right?  

With the labeling requirement, buyers will know they are buying from a home kitchen.  If that bothers them, they can either ask questions or just not buy from a home baker.  That crazy thing called freedom of choice...  

Our country is becoming less and less free everyday.  

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