Top Five Ways to Guarantee Terrible Service

Categories: Lists

waitress99.jpg
Go ahead. Piss her off. Dare ya.
Even if journalism doesn't work out, I know that I won't end up owning a restaurant. I have a terrible palate and a personality that will abuse the right to refuse service rule.

In all my years of serving, I've never, ever spat in someone's food or drink. I don't care enough to go around creating biohazards. The servers I work with are much more passive-aggressive. According to an informal survey of my co-workers, these are the top five most common reasons a server will simply quit trying to give good service, tip be damned.

1. Ordering coffee at a place that's neither IHOP or in Alaska
Coffee isn't really an offense or a reason to give bad service, but it's a pain in the ass. We typically don't have a fresh pot of coffee on hand, especially in the afternoon during the spring and summer months. So those of you who roll your eyes when a server says he or she will have to brew a fresh pot, think about what you're asking. Brewing an entire fresh pot of coffee just for you and your $3 slice of pie is actually pretty generous. It's not like you're at Starbucks or something.

I had a table complain that they'd gobbled all their pie in the time it took me to make coffee. Whose fault is that? Think.

2. You're rude from the start
Nobody really wants to serve anybody. Nobody became a server because they get tickled balancing trays of Bud Light and strawberry lemonade and retrieving flesh-melting plates of enchiladas. We do it because somewhere along the line, we made a decision (regrettably poor or otherwise) that landed us in unskilled labor.

Enchilada bearers though we may be, when people start being servers, they don't stop being people. So when I walk up to the table and recite brightly, "Hi there, my name is Brooke, and I'll be..." and you interrupt me to say, "Ice water, extra lemon. And bring me more Splenda," I stop caring about you. It's unforgivably discouraging. Not because you have less manners than gardening soil, but because if I gently remind you that ice water is neither an emotion or a state of being, I'm the rude one. Refuse to acknowledge your server, and it will be a while before that ice water reaches your table. You'll probably have to ask for lemons again. And hope you're OK with Equal, because the server will suddenly forget where the restaurant keeps the Splenda. Revenge is childish and best served cold, like that cup of soup that's been congealing on the line for 10 minutes.

Could be the Southern hospitality in me, but I always appreciate and remember the guests who manage to look up and mutter some kind of greeting, however insincere. We're in this dining experience together: Let's practice civility.

And that business about you trying to skirt the $1.99 price tag and make your own lemonade? Cut that shit out.

3. Waters all around, and you're all splitting an entrée
Especially if you ordered the cheapest thing on the menu. This also applies if one of you is just going to munch the free chips and salsa, or if anybody involved is older than 12, younger than 80 and eating off the kids' menu. If you're not going to spend money to properly feed yourself, why should I think you'll spend money to tip me?

HOG99.jpg
Step away from the table.
4. Oink, oink, table hog
It may not sound like it, but I really want my guests to enjoy their meals. I want them to have a good experience at my restaurant. And I'm not just saying this so they'll like me better and tip me $7 instead of just $5.

But if you finished your meal 30 minutes ago and are still happily chatting at your table, get out of my booth. Take it to the bar. If I can't turn that table for two hours, then I lose a fraction of my income, and I'm just not into that, no matter how much you're enjoying yourself. I suppose you could solve the problem by leaving a tip generous enough that it makes up for all the lost income, but that's a lot of commitment on your part.

To deal with diners who won't get up from the table, I've seen servers completely ignore them and delight as they noisily suck out the last few drops from their water glasses. But the better way is to be over attentive: "Are you done? Was it good? More tea? Anything else? More water? Dessert again? I can get you another menu. Are you done? Was it good?"

Please, stay. Enjoy yourself. Have some coffee! But after a while, please give your table to guests waiting on it.

5. You've tipped poorly before
Well, duh.

Serving may be unskilled labor, but a scorned server instantly becomes a mathematician with the memory of elephants. And servers aren't very good at forgiving people, or believing that they've changed.

If you've left a terrible tip before and your server didn't deserve it, I'm certainly not saying to expect spit in your food. Just watch out.


My Voice Nation Help
60 comments
ST
ST

I just want to say that serving is NOT an unskilled labor! I have been in the F&B business for almost 10 years. I did not make any poor decisions in my life. I went to a University, and even graduated with THREE degrees. Serving and bartending are the only jobs that have flexible hours to accomodate school schedules that change every 4 months. There is a LOT more to serving than just making drinks and carrying plates to a table (especially if you are a good server)!! And we do all of this physical labor for only a guaranteed $2 an hour (which in reality is just our way of claiming income and paying taxes)?!?!I find it completely offensive to say that servers are unskilled and make poor decisions that "land" us in that job. Also, keep in mind that there are SEVERAL people out there who have day jobs and then go to a restaurant at night to make a little extra money. We stay on our feet the whole shift, we dont get to eat until odd hours of the night, we have no health benefits or 401k, we have no sick days or vacation days to use. And keep in mind, when its a holiday (or even a Sunday morning!) and you get to go out with your lovely family, WE are the ones who make that possible for you, at the sacrifice of OUR families.

Lisa
Lisa

championofzero, well your name says it all. Smoke, what you smokin dude? And the article was somewhat lame, however, the "free lemonaid" comment was priceless. come on you cheap-ass people, pay for the softdrink. And you people who insist on boiling water to rinse your silverware and eating from the dang buffet at Golden Corral( and yes, I MEANT to say 'you people") REALLY? REALLY? If any of you 'neverbeenintheindustry"folks had any clue, you would never eat out again. You think everyone wears gloves when preparing your food? No, it's not feasible. We can and do wash our hands, but I'm tellin ya, not every server washes their hands after using the toilet, scratch their heads, touch thier faces, I could go on and on... For the record, I've never spit in anyones food as payback, but hot damn, that lemon in your "lemonaid" may have touched the floor before it hit your glass! lol jokes on your rude cheap self!! HA HA

sigh
sigh

Article should be titled "5 ways to not get a tip if you are a server"

;;
;;

Customer entitlement is out of control these days and customers seem to have no sense of responsibility. Restaurant workers are (more often than not) treated as second-class citizens and customers are expecting that restaurants be subservient to their demands and class-less behaviors.

For instance, how does it feel when people cut you off mid-sentence to order you around? This customer's behavior explicitly tells you that her need for soup is more important than the fact that you have a right to speak. You are a slave. You have no freedoms and no voice.

Another example: how does it feel to clean up a child's vomit when the parents just get up and leave? How does it feel when someone decides its okay to change their baby's diapers in your dining room? You are a custodian and you double as a public bathroom.

It's a tough economy for everyone. Restaurants are closing, people are going out to eat less; should we be grateful you are bringing your precious dollars to my establishment? Yes, thank you for allowing us the privilege of serving you. It's all about being treated with decency. Be a good guest and it makes it easier for us to be a good host.

Ashleysueellen
Ashleysueellen

This is the STUPIDEST article I've ever read...yes, I can sympathize with the rudeness of customers or people who split the cheapest thing on the menu or hog tables (I always try to be mindful of such things when I eat out), but BOO-HOO, you're being PAID to brew that coffee!! DEAL WITH IT and be glad you have a JOB in this economy!

wailuachef
wailuachef

Hi. I own a restaurant. Before anyone starts on the 'unskilled labor gets what it deserves' bit, I'm a culinary school grad with 30 years in the business. I've been on the Food Network, Travel Channel, and have worked in some of the most beautiful locations on earth. A few pointers for a great restaurant experience:1. Treat service personnel as you would like to be treated. You don't have a birthright to good service. Treat people with respect and you'll be amazed at what you get in return.2. Treat the restaurant industry as you would any other. If you purchased software, used it for a month then tried to get your money back while displaying a rotten attitude...you get the point.3. You're a vegan, pescetarian, gluten-free, macrobiotic, hand-strangled food-only diner? Great! I'll do what I can, but don't act as if I should make your life choice my only priority. And don't believe for a second that I'm impressed by what you don't eat. Not happy? Here's a lemon and a cup of hot water. 4. Stop inventing your own menu items. "I see you have eggplant over here, and shrimp over here, so I'll have shrimp with eggplant!" Nice. This isn't Build a Bear. Special orders slow down kitchen service, thereby ruining your fellow diners' experience. Are you a foodie or a wannabe chef? Step up buttercup, and open your own restaurant.5. Speaking of ruining the experience, please contain your kids. I have two young children. We work on manners and proper behavior. They say "please" and "thank you". We do not allow them to run rampant through someone's business. We do not allow them to stand on the furniture, color on the table, or throw food on the floor. If you don't allow it in your home, don't allow it in mine. If you do allow it in your home, stay there.6. Lastly, I don't care if you're from the Bay area, or Seattle, or New York. I know you've been to better restaurants than mine. I'm happy that your nephew is in culinary school. Yes, I understand that my schooling and years of culinary experience are no match for your undying devotion to Chopped and Tailgate Throwdown. I'm a professional. I grind out 80-hour weeks doing this thing I love, not talking about it, or watching it on TV. Don't judge me based on what you think you know. Just. Be. Nice.

Monsterzero
Monsterzero

The people calling waiters whiney are apparently lucky enough to not have had to do this job at any time in their lives. I have worked in bars and restaurants a loooooong time and just because you have better jobs doesn't give you the right to come to our work and be a bunch of assholes. Most of you are the whiniest, pickiest cry babies. Always having to have custom orders.... if you don't like the what's on the menu take your fat ass home and make a sandwich then. And for the cooks, their jobs require more than just cooking for your lazy ass, so don't come into a place that's obviously busy and expect YOUR food in just a few minutes. There's lots of other assholes ahead of who also think the world revolves around them.

Noochiann
Noochiann

I will pray tonight that I will never be subjected to a server with the same attitude as the author of this article. Coffee is a menu item but you are p***ed off at the customer who orders it? That's just outrageous. And, unless the restaurant posts and enforces a drink minimum rule, customers are perfectly entitled to drink water. It's probably what they do at home....why should they have to do something differently when they eat out? To please their server? Is this a joke and I missed it?

teachergirl23
teachergirl23

I hate that one about coffee. Servers who complain about that would not last a second up North. In the North coffee is sacred. People drink it all day everyday. I know many groups in my hometown who gather at 9 or 10pm to drink coffee and shoot the breeze. Some people drink a pot or more daily-all in restaurants. And the whole $2.13 an hour? Why do people advise other people to go into waiting tables if they want to make a lot of money relatively quickly, for example college students? If there was no money in it, nobody would ever do it.

Anonymous
Anonymous

#1- If coffee is offered on your menu, why is it such an inconvenience to offer it to your customers? If it's detracting from the service, discuss with the manager whether it should continue to be on the menu.#2- Fair enough that there's no excuse for rude/condescending behavior, but it's just as childish to refuse to offer someone Splenda (read, to do your job) for that reason.#3- If you have a problem with a splitting policy, take it up with your manager. I don't drink soda, tea, etc, so if I'm not having alcohol at a meal, all I'm drinking is water. I'm not going to order a drink I don't want just so that your tip can be higher. Deal with it. I'm also not ordering an appetizer or meal I don't want just so your tip can be higher.#4- This is also something your manager should help you with, as he/she also has a vested interest in making sure tables turnover on a busy day/night. A minority of patrons tip based on time with they take up a table when they stop ordering food, but this makes the assumption that the place is packed.#5- You probably remember being tipped poorly, but I'll also bet you also remember providing amazing service. That may not be the reality. If you feel like you're constantly being stiffed, maybe you are honestly just a bad waiter. There will always be people out there willing to tip 20% even for terrible service because they know what a crap job it is. Don't let a few good tips convince you that you are the best server out there. It may or may not be true.

Rumpunch
Rumpunch

I think that the basic conclusion to the story is this - everyone should stop being jerks. I feel like I am in New Jersey sometime. Rude waiters and rude customers. I think that I only really agree with #2 and #5. But as one commentator has already said, it is a two way street. Whether your the server or the customer, the attitude you have at the start will drive the other person's attitude (i.e. bad service or bad tip) The memory thing is also a two way street, servers remember the bad tippers and customers remember the bad servers.

I have a large family, therefore I have had to create a small resume of servers I use. I know there schedules and do not patronize their establishments if they are not there. They serve me well because I am friendly and a good tipper and I come back and tip because they are attentive and friendly.

The other issues 1. ordering coffee - the cost I am charged for a cup of coffee includes the labor and potential waste involved. 3. Water and split entrees - if I cannot or should not eat your entire served portion and me and my wife want the same thing I should be able to do so. Sometimes it is a cost issue - be glad we are still going out to eat. 4. table hogs - again, this is why I go to the same places time after time. I generally go later in the evening and stay till about close. My waiter knows that. If I am not in a rush, I let them know. He makes sure the drink and appetizers come, but does not rush the entrees.

I live in the South by choice. Lets all act like ladies and gentlemen and things will improve.

Was a Server Now a customer
Was a Server Now a customer

This goes both ways - you should write an article on ways to guarantee getting a bad or zero tip. This would include items such as: 1) The disappearing server - empty glasses (or something else) with no server seen for 20 minutes. 2) The disappearing server when a customer is ready to leave - so the table could be open but can't be opened due to the server NOT giving the check to the customer until the table is set on fire as a signal for service. 3) Cold food syndrome - the server busy doing "other things" so the food sits in the kitchen and by the time he/she gets the food to the table, it is cold. 4) The never seen server - when arriving at a restaurant, sitting down at a table for 15-20 minutes looking at menus without the server ever showing up at all - too busy doing "other things". 5) The rude server who had a bad last night and is mad about having to work today - acts as if the customer is causing a big problem if a question is asked about the menu. 6) The it's not my fault server - the server who does one, some, or all of items 1-5 above and then assuming the customer's a jerk because they leave a bad/no tip. They think they provide "great" service.

Amonynous
Amonynous

Way to retweet the same article... gg Observer Social Media Crew.

Kevin John Gilhooly
Kevin John Gilhooly

I always find it interesting that there is more whining in the comments for articles like this than in the article itself.

I'd never really considered the coffee issue, but it always comes up when I order decaf, so it's the same principle, I'm sure. For those who don't get it, brewed coffee has a shelf life. If you have to make 12 cups so somebody can have one, that's 11 cups of coffee that are going to get tossed in an hour or two. So, next time you hear "I have to make a fresh pot", don't bitch. Just enjoy your coffee and eleven refills.

Titus Groan
Titus Groan

Hey Brooke,

Guess what? You think I like getting up at 4:30am every day and heading in to the office? Filling out asinine paperwork? Having to take on more duties as staff gets cut and having my pay frozen as a reward?

Work sucks, honey. But the alternative sucks worse. So...plaster a smile on your face and get me my damn coffee.

kYle
kYle

I have no problem tipping 20% or more for good service, less for substandard. That said, please post the picture of the gun being held to your head when you signed up to be a server. What's that? You don't have one. Then kindly go back to doing the job you chose.

In the real world, you know the one where you don't get a trophy for playing on a win less shitty ass soccer team, no one cares about your myriad of reasons for substandard performance (regardless of how valid they may be).

Brnn
Brnn

I can agree with most of this except for the coffee thing and the table hog problem. I'm not understanding what's so difficult about coffee, it's not even something I usually get outside of a coffee house, but it's not like the server goes to the back and hand grounds coffee beans. Nowadays you put the grinds in a filter put the filter in and press on. It's really not difficult.

Also, if I come into a restaurant and want to stay past my meal I will. I pay and I tip well (at least 20%) and if I'm enjoying my conversation I will stay. It's my right and I matter just as much as the people coming in after me.

Howkel
Howkel

I'm ordering coffee. I don't care if it's a pain in your ass.

Ps. I'm a bartender and I tip great. Be nice.

Jst0604
Jst0604

Just because people split an entree and order water doesn't mean they're not going to tip well. If they've come in before and ordered an entree and water and left $1, then sure, I can understand not wanting to give them good service. But if it's a party you've never seen, you need to give them the benefit of the doubt, as well as good service. They may not be wanting to spend a lot of money so they *can* tip you well. We split entrees all the time and we always leave at least 20 percent - if we get good service.

MattL1
MattL1

Where is all this vitriol toward servers coming from? This article doesn't seem to me so much an "I hate my job" thing as a "certain things piss me off" thing. I enjoyed a lot about waiting tables, but there were certain things and types of customers that pissed me off. As Dallas is the type of place where people go out to eat a lot, is it not good to attempt to improve server-customer relations? Many customers don't know or don't consider what goes into certain aspects of the food service process. I see no problem pointing out some of the more irritating sticking points.

A little civility never hurt anybody, though judging from some of the responses here, that fact may have been lost in a cloud of self-importance.

SMASH
SMASH

To the people that don't like us servers complaining:

I want to know, why do you go out to eat? I'm going on a hunch here saying that a majority of it is that you do not want to put the work into buying the groceries, preping the food, cooking the food, then serving the food.

When you do out to eat, you are provided a service. This service costs a price. For example, the reason it costs $9 for 2 enchilladas, rice, and beans is because the resturant bought the food, and the cooks preped and cooked it for you to your liking.

So, the reason you SHOULD leave a 20% tip for proper service is because your server took care of the rest. We usually provide you with warm hospitality, get you your drinks (and keep them full) bring out and serve your food, and take care of the rest along the way to make the experience enjoyable for you so that you will come back (These things include picking up after you and your table, doing our best to insure your children as satisified, and making sure that you are comfortable) . If a server takes care of you to the extent where it makes you want to come back again and again, and might possibly want to ensure the same server as well as the same quality of service, then tip generously.

Now, I'm not saying that every experience is going to be great, it's not. But use common sense. I just ask that you keep in mind that we do not make minimum wage, we make $2.13 per hour which does not even cover our taxes. We get no pay check. In fact, it costs us money to wait tables because we tip out the bartenders and the bussing staff, and the hostess out of the tips you leave us. If you want to be insured good service, be polite and curteous to your server - that's really all we ask.

Now if you feel that you do not have to tip (or treat us servers like human beings) then go to fucking whataburger where you get your shit yourself.

Steve Sandwich
Steve Sandwich

You're not going to bring up the, uh, black elephant in the room when it comes to tipping?

Justin Julian
Justin Julian

Here's where I get to join the grumpy people: you're at work. I don't care if you don't like it. Don't like serving? Find other work, get educated, or otherwise bail. Your job is to serve me, and as long as I'm paying for the food, I expect it to be done well. Now, I'm both extremely polite and a good tipper, but stories like this are part of the problem, not part of the solution. Oh, and before I get 'wow, you must work a job where you get paid more and work less' yeah...um...I'm UNEMPLOYED. I'd BE serving right now if I didn't have a bum leg that keeps me out of jobs where I can be physically active like that. I'd be digging ditches if I had my choice. This is a matter of ethics: if you do not like your job, get another. If you cannot get another, do what you have to do in order to get another. If you don't like the way the law revolves around your chosen job (that classic $2.13 an hour complaint) then lobby to change the law...but good luck with that one, because we ALL know that even with rude customers and bad tippers, servers generally make good money as long as they're good at what they do and work in good places.

In short: serve me properly regardless of what I order, how I order it, or how long I take to eat it. Giving me bad service because you don't like how I'm patronizing your place of work is extremely unethical, and I hope to hell you get fired for it post-haste, making the world a better place overall.

BigChalupa
BigChalupa

I really don't understand all the hate on servers here. This wasn't a "My life sucks because I'm a server" article. This was a fairly accurate list of things that would make anyone cringe if they were having to deal with them. Honestly, aside from the coffee (I'm sometimes guilty of this, but always tip accordingly), these all completely make sense and aren't coming off as complaining at all.

If you think that servers should shut up and do their job, maybe, just maybe, you should just stay home and cook for yourself. Then you don't have to worry about service or tips.

shrubstex
shrubstex

As a single man who has eaten out a lot in his lifetime, you are spot on in your points. The reason is that I have gone out to dinner with some of those dolts you describe. I have learned to up the tip when splitting entrees, and just ordering water. Hell I even tip when I place an order to go. They have just used up finite resources, and bundled a package of food for the ride home.

John Padilla
John Padilla

I can agree with 1, 2 & 5, but 3 & 4? Get over yourself. Sane people in this country know that most restaurants' dinner portions are entirely too large for one person. So it's not just economical but sensible and healthy to split entrees on a semi-regular basis. Furthermore, water with lemon is a perfectly reasonable drink option, because not everyone likes sodas or alcohol. And as far as the coffee bit is considered, that is something that you as the server should take into account when coffee is ordered with desert or in general. Be up front with someone about it or tell them that you can hold off their pie until the coffee is ready so that they can enjoy the two together and they'll thank you for it in the end.

Servers have every right to complain about being stiffed on the tip when good service was delivered. But when a server fails to see the customers' point of view, as in, "Would I have given myself a good tip?", then I have much less sympathy for them.

mercurialvenus
mercurialvenus

Oh thank you! As a former waitress, people NEED to be informed. It's so true, no one REALLY wants to be in the service. We'd rather be drinking. I honestly think that home-ec should be tossed out of a very tall window and instead kids in HS should be forced to work half a semester as a serve and the other half in retail. Gives you something to fall back on, when you inevitably get knocked up.

Championofzero
Championofzero

This is the most horrible article ever. If I am out and spending a C-Note for dinner with my family, your ass is mine for my time there.

God damn, you service-industry people bitch and moan way too much...

Amonynous
Amonynous

LOL.

I can empathize with the author but I can also see the points the first two commentators are making. I've seen particular demographics of persons holding a table for HOURS drinking only water and looking at the menu. This was at the Flying Saucer. Why would you even enter the establishment if you have no intention of drinking a beer? Oh yeah, because you're black, and you don't tip because you think someone owes you something.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Who is acting like an asshole? As best I can tell, this article makes it clear that an asshole customer excuses the wait staff to act unprofessional. That's not how it is supposed to work. A little more respect and civility all around would just make things that much smoother, but you don't get to throw a temper tantrum because you're mistreated by a customer and still get to call yourself a professional. Maybe all this just annoys me because I'm the guy that tips 20% for average service. If the service is bad enough that I make a note of it, I leave 15%. If it truly damaged the overall dining experience, I'll leave 10%. I can count on one hand the number of times I've left less than that, and once it was because a server quit mid-shift. Maybe it's my own fault for rewarding average service with what is apparently an above average tip, but I am really sick and tired of waiters acting like they are the most put upon profession in the world.

G_David
G_David

When they start charging 1/12th the price of a pot for a single cup, then your argument will almost make sense.

nosdrahcir
nosdrahcir

Oh, and you might hate having to do paperwork, but I'll put money on it that my old job slapping manholes together for 12 hours a day in the Florida sun trumps it.  Anything else to say?

nosdrahcir
nosdrahcir

So the alternative to waiting tables is getting up before 5 every day to do paperwork?

 

I didn't realize there were 2 jobs in the entire world.

nosdrahcir
nosdrahcir

Are you saying only substandard performers become servers?

 

The fact is a lot of degree-holding graduates are waiting tables because the jobs just aren't THERE right now.  There are multiple reasons for people being forced to do things they don't want to in order to keep themselves and their families fed.

chicago
chicago

Agreed! I usually can't even make my way through a third of my hugely portioned entrees. So why should I have to pay for an extra entree that won't taste good later when reheated at home just so I can assure the server they'll get a good tip? And I don't drink pop or iced tea, so water is often my beverage of choice. I tip well, but a customer should be able to order what they'd like without feeling like their service will be affected. I might also order the cheapest entree on the menu, but that's because I'm a vegetarian and typically that's the cheapest and only thing on the menu I can eat.

That being said, I agree with most of the writer's other points.

Amonynous
Amonynous

I attempted to, but knowing the Dallas political and educational environment I'm not surprised by the backlash it generated. You can call me a bigot but it doesn't make it true, and it doesn't change the fact that by-and-large, most (uneducated, young) black people refuse to tip and go out of their way to make servers' lives hellish. I feel sorry for the staff at Papadeaux's on Oaklawn after church on Sunday.

Fmhsdude2002
Fmhsdude2002

Are you following your own advice here? "I'm UNEMPLOYED...do what you have to do in order to get another."

In short, be a human being and care about your fellow human being and you will be taken care of politely and with excellent service. Ethically speaking, every action deserves (and will receive) and equal and opposite reaction. Remember that when you're out (proverbial you, not you specifically because as you said...you are "extremely polite and a good tipper").

John Padilla
John Padilla

The other side of the coin is that you've essentially just tipped the cashier for the service of food prep which is of course the duty of the cooks. Cooks get paid pretty well by comparison, so really you're leaving tip for no services rendered. Not everyone can afford to be so generous as you, kind sir.

Amonynous
Amonynous

You wouldn't go into a bar and order just water would you? Well, you probably would, and you'd waste everyone's time while you're there, too.

anon
anon

Especially if your kids go to a school in the Garland ISD.

Coleman
Coleman

self-entitled much, dude?

Amonynous
Amonynous

They wouldn't have to bitch if people tipped fairly. Sadly, most people think just because they can afford something on the menu that their responsibility ends there.TIPS= "To Insure Proper Service" and the servers hold up their end of the bargain on faith that the customers won't be shit-asses.

Nunya
Nunya

Learn how to spell anonymous, you bigot.

Jonas M Luster
Jonas M Luster

"Cooks get paid pretty well by comparison". As someone who has spent the past 21 years in both front and back of house, I _strongly_ disagree.

Cooks are paid much less than servers, despite the job being physically more exhausting, more dangerous, and being longer hours. And that's not counting the fact that cooks generall can't afford to live near the restaurants they work at, adding long commutes.

As a server in a fine dining restaurant I played by the international rulebook of about ten minutes per table. Less per smaller parties, fourtops being the gold standard. At $100 for a party of four (and that's low), I made $16 in tips on average. That's over $50 an hour, with taxes assessed only at 7 per cent of the deal. A sous chef, being in the back long before the front arrived and leaving long after, makes on average $11 per hour in Dallas, with - again on average - sixteen unpaid hours per week. That's quite the discrepancy between the untrained labor in front and the trained ones in the back.

As a server I had days where I walked home clutching a four-figure tip. Just like a reverse gambler, instead of reliving the one day the jackpot came, servers love to dwell on the one day no one tipped, conveniently forgetting that the day before they hauled a triple-digit loot. Personally, and as a male server (who statistically make 35% less in tips), I generally took home as much tip over a weekend as I made in a seven-day shift as a cook.

Waiter/FoH is the second highest paid untrained labor position in the United States. Cook is the lowest paid (source, as everything else in this comment via payscale.com).

The tipping system in the United States is broken. It not only delegates the duty of job evaluation onto the customer instead of the employer, it also functions on unwritten rules, non-existant contracts, and guilt. The aura of entitlement to high double-digit compensation for single digit minutes of work is quite pervasive. That doesn't make it right.

Bartender
Bartender

Actually the "cashier" usually puts in the order, boxes it, makes salads, any extra things that were requested and cashes you out.

shrubstex
shrubstex

The server gets the Styrofoam package off the food shelf , asks what I want to drink, gets the cups out, puts the beverage in the cups, and puts lids on them, gets napkins, and silverware (usually prepackaged) and then bags up all the goodies and hands them to me. She could have handled 4 orders to a table in the same amount of time she just gave me. She deserves a tip as I pay for my order.

Smokey Problemson
Smokey Problemson

True, but if it's busy then the bartender spent time he/she could have been using to schmooze customers or serving more drinks to earn more tips talking to you on the phone, packaging everything properly, etc. I figure that's usually good for a buck or so, but for me to-go tipping is a case by case basis.

Generally the reason I'm polite to servers and give them the benefit of the doubt is the same reason I smile and make eye contact with gas station/ fast food/ retail/ all customer service employees, wave on the freeway, and get all those other pleasantries in--because I want to contribute pleasantness to the world rather than nastiness, and because you get better results when you're kind and remind yourself that the world stresses other people out too.

Steve Sandwich
Steve Sandwich

So TIPS references an insurance policy that is purchased post-service? Shouldn't it be "TEPS" and "ensure?"

Amonynous
Amonynous

Also, I'd point you to my reply to Steve Sandwich down the comments list. I'm more than happy to piss a few people off if it brings a real issue to the table that everyone else is afraid to comment on. (GET IT? TABLE?!LOLOLOL)

Amonynous
Amonynous

U so mad. I think the joke is lost on you, and i don't think you've ever been in the service industry because I feel confident anyone that has ever had to deal with certain individuals knows EXACTLY the type of behavior I'm referring to. You can live your life being PC or you can attempt to tell the plain truth, it's your choice.

Amonynous
Amonynous

You missed the point entirely, next time check out exactly what The Flying Saucer is before replying with some knee-jerk, argumentative crap.

Nunya
Nunya

I won't say more because I make it a point not to argue with an idiot. Enjoy your little bubble and I hope the "blacks" continue to not tip you. You deserve it. Cheerio!

(GET IT?? LOLOLOLOLZ!)

G_David
G_David

So Sjm, you don't tip the guy that has to burn his own gas to deliver you a pizza? Then you're just making that other guy's point for him, perpetuating the stereotype (which certainly is based on the actual experience of service industry folks), and should probably just go pick up your f'ing pizza yourself.

Sjm752003
Sjm752003

Anonymous:

I am a 'certain individual' who is BLACK. Start running now, ya smirky racist a.z.z.!

Now that I have your attention, I tip at least 20% because I KNOW people in restaurants make less than minimum wage, and have to rely on tips (and yes, tips are taxed) as income. Occasionally I'll even overtip because of the stereotype that 'Black people don't tip'.

Now IF I'm not at a restaurant or a bar with sit-down meal service, but ordering, say, a Domino's Pizza instead, normally I wouldn't tip. Go on and get mad.

Sometimes, if there's a tip jar at a local, small business establishment, I'll tip IF I have change. For example, sometimes I'll tip at the arts related organization I volunteer for. Sometimes I'll put change in the tip jar at Starbucks (especially if I'm using their Wi-Fi).

As for what the world owes me, all this society owes me is a chance. An opportunity. What I do with that opportunity is up to me. However, other BLACK people have told me that I have my health and an education, which is "opportunity enough". WHAT I'M TRYING TO SAY IS THAT WE DON'T ALL THINK ALIKE, ACT ALIKE, just as I can assume there are some non-black people who aren't evil.

We can keep this up all night.

Now Trending

From the Vault

 

Loading...